Beethoven gets Dangerous: Book reveals Michael Jackson’s use of classical music in hit songs

Author Anthony King says Michael Jackson used classical music pieces in hit songs and few people noticed. Above, the King of Pop performs in Vienna in 1997. (Reuters)
Updated 11 August 2018
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Beethoven gets Dangerous: Book reveals Michael Jackson’s use of classical music in hit songs

  • Author focuses particularly on two of Jackson’s best-selling albums, 1991’s Dangerous and 1995’s HIStory, both of which feature numerous classical-music samples
  • Jackson had the biggest-selling classical piece — using Beethoven’s ninth symphony on Dangerous

DUBAI: He’s often referred to as the King of Pop, but a new book suggests the late Michael Jackson may also have been history’s most-prolific seller of songs incorporating classical music.
London-based choreographer, author and professional Michael Jackson impersonator Anthony King is in the process of writing a six-book series on the pop legend. In “Michael Jackson and Classical Music,” released this week, King argues that the entertainer’s extensive use of classical music (which King told Arab News “literally no one on earth seems to have noticed”) likely means that MJ sold “more albums which incorporated classical music than any other person in history, as well as having the single biggest-selling album incorporating a classical composition.”
The book, King said, “is full of exclusives that have never been discussed publicly before. It’s shocking that this is not (widely) known.”

King focuses particularly on two of Jackson’s best-selling albums, 1991’s “Dangerous” and 1995’s “HIStory,” both of which feature numerous classical-music samples. “Will You Be There?” from “Dangerous,” for example, includes a segment of Beethoven’s “Symphony No.9,” while “Little Susie,” off “HIStory,” has “Pie Jesu” for an intro. King cites numerous other examples of Jackson’s use of classical tunes, mentioning composers including Carl Orff, Modest Mussorgsky, and Miklós Rózsa. King believes sales of the two albums, including downloads, would total around 76.6 million.
“Michael Jackson exposed more people to classical music, live, during his “HIStory” world tour — about 4.5 million — than five years’ worth of sold-out performances at (New York’s) Carnegie Hall,” King continued. “When you think of classical musicians, you think of Luciano Pavarotti or Andrea Bocelli. But Jackson really did have the biggest-selling classical piece — (by) using Beethoven’s ninth symphony on ‘Dangerous.’

He would put these classical pieces within the songs and no one really noticed them. It was shocking to me.”
King said his book series on Jackson is motivated by “setting the historical record straight.”
“I met Michael many times, so I can put the truth out there and it cannot really be disputed,” he said. “I can exclusively reveal that Michael played classical music through the speaker system in his Neverland estate. One of the pieces was (Carl) Bach’s ‘Sonata for Flute in A-minor.’
“I can state the facts and I can state the evidence clearly,” King continued. “(That) is essentially what I am doing with my books.”


What We Are Reading Today: Churchill: Walking with destiny by Andrew Roberts

Updated 20 November 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Churchill: Walking with destiny by Andrew Roberts

  • The story Roberts tells is sophisticated and in the end more satisfying
  • The book being deals with all the controversies in his career that you would expect

Winston Churchill was born on Nov. 30, 1874, at Blenheim Palace, the ancestral home of the Duke of Marlborough. 

Historian Andrew Roberts’ insight about Winston Churchill’s relation to fate in “Churchill: Walking With Destiny” comes directly from the subject himself. 

“I felt as if I were walking with destiny,” Churchill wrote of that moment in May 1940 when he achieved the highest office. 

But the story Roberts tells is more sophisticated and in the end more satisfying. 

The book covers Churchill’s post-war warnings about the Soviet threat and his second premiership in the early-to-mid 1950s, including his complex relationship with Anthony Eden, his successor-in-waiting. 

Roberts, who was born in 1963, took a first class honors degree in Modern History at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, from where he is an honorary senior scholar and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). He has written or edited 12 books, and appears regularly on radio and television around the world.

“The book being deals with all the controversies in his career that you would expect. However nothing can detract from the ultimate conclusion that Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was a very great man without whom humane civilization would not have been saved during those stern days of the Second World War,” stated a review published in goodreads.com