Virtual currencies not approved in Saudi Arabia, government committee warns

The Standing Committee for Awareness on Dealing with Unauthorized Securities Activities in the Foreign Exchange Market (Forex) warns virtual digital currencies are not supported within the Kingdom and dealing with them is risky. (AFP)
Updated 12 August 2018
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Virtual currencies not approved in Saudi Arabia, government committee warns

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia's special governmental committee for awareness on dealing with unauthorized securities activities in the foreign exchange market (Forex) has warned against transactions and investments using virtual currencies.
The committee, assembled by a royal order, has warned that such transactions could have “negative consequences” on dealers because of the associated risk with such dealings that are "outside the monitoring umbrella within Saudi Arabia.
The committee said such virtual or cryptocurrencies that are traded through the internet, like Bitcoin and similar virtual currencies, are not approved in the Kingdom.
It said “allegations” on websites that promote investments in such currencies on the internet and social media platforms claiming that they are “authorized” by official authorities in the Kingdom are incorrect.
It warned citizens and residents “not to drift” behind Forex activities that exploit the public's for fast earnings.


Iraqi delegation in Riyadh cements ties with Saudi Arabia

Updated 11 min 19 sec ago
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Iraqi delegation in Riyadh cements ties with Saudi Arabia

  • First Iraqi bank branch opened in Saudi Arabia

RIYADH: A large Iraqi delegation, featuring government departments and representatives from the private sector, has arrived in Saudi Arabia to take part in a host of events, talks and opening ceremonies to cement ties between the two nations.

Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi was greeted by King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, and held high-level talks with both on a number of topics, ranging from bilateral cooperation in defense to shared investment projects. 

He also met with the Secretary-General of the Gulf Cooperation Council Dr. Abdullatif bin Rashid Al-Zayani, who congratulated him on the recent defeat of the militant group Daesh by Iraqi and coalition forces.

Abdul Mahdi was also the guest of honor at the opening ceremony of a major exhibition, “Age Old Cities Destroyed by Terrorism,” at the National Museum in Riyadh.

Abdul Mahdi later signed a number of memorandums of understanding (MoUs) between Iraq and Saudi Arabia, and briefly joined discussions between his country’s oil ministry and the Kingdom’s minister of commerce and investment, Dr. Majid bin Abdullah Al-Qassabi, before leaving Riyadh for an official visit to Jeddah.

Elsewhere, there were a number of bilateral departmental meetings between Iraqi and Saudi government ministers to discuss various areas of mutual interest and cooperation.

Iraqi Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammad Ali Al-Hakim met with his Saudi counterpart Adel Al-Jubeir; Dr. Hamad bin Mohammed Al-Sheikh, the Kingdom’s education minister, held talks with Iraq’s Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research Dr. Qusay Abdul Wahab Al-Suhail; and there were further meetings between other ministries concerning energy, agriculture, infrastructure, food and health.

The visit also saw important developments in the financial relations between the two states, as Trade Bank of Iraq (TBI) became the first Iraqi bank to open a branch in Saudi Arabia after unveiling its first foreign premises in Riyadh on Thursday.

The branch office in Al-Olayya district was officially opened by Fuad Hussein, Iraq’s deputy prime minister. He was joined at the ceremony by Ahmed Al-Khulaifi, the governor of the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority, and Faisal Al-Haimus, chairman of TBI.

The bank was established shortly after the invasion of Iraq in 2003 by the US-led coalition, whose provisional authorities used it to facilitate stagnant trade and kickstart the economy following the conclusion of initial hostilities and the start of the occupation, coupled with the end of the UN’s 1995 Oil-for-Food Programme. Around 80 percent of TBI is controlled by the Iraqi government.

“This is a hugely significant day for the financial sector of Iraq and the country as a whole,” said Hussein. “This is an important step toward reinforcing our relationship with the Saudi government, and we look forward to advancing bilateral ties between our countries.”

Speaking to Arab News, Al-Haimus said: “This is a very important step, as all trade between any two countries requires financing. Our Riyadh branch will provide the funds and assistance to facilitate that trade, and will increase the present level, currently around $500 million annually, to about $4 billion by next year.”