Saudi courts think green by going paperless

The aim of this step is to reduce the flow of cases to the general courts. (SPA)
Updated 12 August 2018

Saudi courts think green by going paperless

  • The ministry has streamlined required procedures to save time and provide a hassle-free service to customers
  • Electronic services also include filling initial pleading, query on the dates of hearing sessions

JEDDAH: The Saudi Ministry of Justice has said its “paperless courts” project across the Kingdom is meant to contribute to reducing paper waste and saving the environment.
The ministry launched the initiative in 2017 to digitally connect courts, re-direct the majority of the procedures online, eliminate almost 90 percent of paperwork and save time and efforts for clients.
“We have emphasized the importance of paperless courts in terms of increasing efficiency, digitizing our services and all,” said Majid Al-Khamis, head of Corporate Communications in the ministry. “But what is also important to us, and what we see as valuable in this project, is its positive impact on the environment.
“This initiative will contribute to paper waste reduction, help protect the environment, and support the Kingdom’s future plans for waste management and transforming waste into clean energy projects,” Al-Khamis said.
According to research published by the General Authority of Meteorology and Environmental Protection, Saudi Arabia generates more than 15 million tons of solid waste each year, and paper waste is the second largest type of solid waste after organic waste, making around 29 percent of the total solid waste.
These statistics made the ministry realize the importance of taking such an initiative.

The ministry also recently introduced a new e-service. The justice minister directed his ministry to start receiving requests for the implementation of the unified housing lease in the execution courts as an executive bond through the “unified lease contract,” after linking electronically with the Ministry of Housing.
The new lease offers applicants the right to apply directly to the Court of Execution in clear electronic proceedings.
The aim of this step is to reduce the flow of cases to the general courts. Under the new system, real estate owners can now apply through the “unified lease agreement,” which is registered in the electronic rental network, directly to the executive courts and departments, through the ministry’s portal, if the tenant does not pay the value of the rent when due.


Fraud alert over cryptocurrency falsely linked to Saudi Arabia

Updated 21 August 2019

Fraud alert over cryptocurrency falsely linked to Saudi Arabia

  • The website of a cryptocurrency company is promoting what it calls the CryptoRiyal and SmartRiyal
  • The Singapore-based company uses the Saudi emblem of two crossed swords and a palm tree

JEDDAH: Fraudsters are trying to lure victims into investing in a “virtual currency” with false claims that it is linked to the Saudi riyal and will be used to finance key projects, the Saudi Ministry of Finance warned on Tuesday.

The website of a cryptocurrency company in Singapore is promoting what it calls the CryptoRiyal and SmartRiyal, using the Saudi emblem of two crossed swords and a palm tree. Its “ultimate goal” is to finance NEOM, the smart city and tourist destination being built in the north of the Kingdom, the company claims.

“Any use of the KSA name, national currency or national emblem by any entity for virtual or digital currencies marketing will be subject to legal action by the competent authorities in the Kingdom,” the ministry said on Tuesday.

The fraudsters were exploiting ignorance of how virtual currencies work, cryptocurrency expert Dr. Assad Rizq told Arab News.

“A lot of tricks can be played,” he said. “Some of these companies are not regulated, they have no assets, and even their prospectus is sometimes copied from other projects.

“They hype and pump their project so the price goes up. Inexpert investors, afraid of missing out, jump in, which spikes the price even higher. Then the owners sell up and make tons of money.

“Cryptocurrencies are a risky investment for two reasons. First, the sector is not yet fully regulated and a lot of projects use fake names and identities, such as countries’ names or flags, to manipulate investors.

“Second, you have to do your homework, learn about the technology. And if you still want to invest, consider your country’s rules and regulations.”