Saudi courts think green by going paperless

The aim of this step is to reduce the flow of cases to the general courts. (SPA)
Updated 12 August 2018
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Saudi courts think green by going paperless

  • The ministry has streamlined required procedures to save time and provide a hassle-free service to customers
  • Electronic services also include filling initial pleading, query on the dates of hearing sessions

JEDDAH: The Saudi Ministry of Justice has said its “paperless courts” project across the Kingdom is meant to contribute to reducing paper waste and saving the environment.
The ministry launched the initiative in 2017 to digitally connect courts, re-direct the majority of the procedures online, eliminate almost 90 percent of paperwork and save time and efforts for clients.
“We have emphasized the importance of paperless courts in terms of increasing efficiency, digitizing our services and all,” said Majid Al-Khamis, head of Corporate Communications in the ministry. “But what is also important to us, and what we see as valuable in this project, is its positive impact on the environment.
“This initiative will contribute to paper waste reduction, help protect the environment, and support the Kingdom’s future plans for waste management and transforming waste into clean energy projects,” Al-Khamis said.
According to research published by the General Authority of Meteorology and Environmental Protection, Saudi Arabia generates more than 15 million tons of solid waste each year, and paper waste is the second largest type of solid waste after organic waste, making around 29 percent of the total solid waste.
These statistics made the ministry realize the importance of taking such an initiative.

The ministry also recently introduced a new e-service. The justice minister directed his ministry to start receiving requests for the implementation of the unified housing lease in the execution courts as an executive bond through the “unified lease contract,” after linking electronically with the Ministry of Housing.
The new lease offers applicants the right to apply directly to the Court of Execution in clear electronic proceedings.
The aim of this step is to reduce the flow of cases to the general courts. Under the new system, real estate owners can now apply through the “unified lease agreement,” which is registered in the electronic rental network, directly to the executive courts and departments, through the ministry’s portal, if the tenant does not pay the value of the rent when due.


Riyadh hosts commercial arbitration conference

Updated 13 min 16 sec ago
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Riyadh hosts commercial arbitration conference

Hussam Al Mayman RIYADH: The inaugural International Conference on Commercial Arbitration began on Monday in Riyadh.
The conference, organized by the Saudi Center for Commercial Arbitration, has gathered six ministers, 47 experts from 15 countries, and a number of decision-makers.
Dr. Hamed Meera, the center’s executive director, said it is in the advanced stages with the Justice Ministry of transferring some commercial mediation cases from commercial courts to the center.
It has entered into a strategic partnership with one of the oldest arbitration centers in the world, the AAA, to prepare the Saudi center’s rules and training of staff, Meera added.
The center provides effective alternatives to settle commercial disputes instead of going straight to court, he said.
“The center is not a competitor to the judiciary courts, but is complementary and aims to reduce the burden on them,” he added.
“The center is one of Vision 2030’s initiatives to facilitate business and attract foreign investment,” he said.
“It provides an effective, efficient and independent dispute-settlement solution, and extensive flexibility and broad options for parties in terms of choice of law, language, selection, nationality, specialization, arbitration sessions and time.”
During his speech at the conference, Justice Minister Walid Al-Samani said arbitration is a means to support the settlement of disputes.
“Commercial arbitration contributes to the speed of completing and settling disputes. We are very optimistic about what has been achieved by the Saudi Center for Commercial Arbitration, and the support for institutional arbitration must be broadened,” he added.
“I am optimistic about the efforts and enthusiasm I have seen. We need more awareness of commercial arbitration, and we look forward to a greater role of chambers of commerce in this direction.”