'The Meg:' A giant shark movie that lacks the killer bite

1 / 2
Loosely based on the 1997 book, “Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror” by Steve Alten, the screen version has Statham playing an underwater rescue diver. (Supplied)
2 / 2
Loosely based on the 1997 book, “Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror” by Steve Alten, the screen version has Statham playing an underwater rescue diver. (Supplied)
Updated 13 August 2018
0

'The Meg:' A giant shark movie that lacks the killer bite

  • oosely based on the 1997 book, “Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror” by Steve Alten, the screen version has Statham playing an underwater rescue diver
  • “The Meg” has more excitement to offer, and somewhat along the lines of “Jaws” we see a second giant shark attacking beach swimmers

CHENNAI: It seems that “Jaws,” Steven Spielberg’s classic 1975 movie adapted from Peter Benchley’s novel, can never be dislodged from its high pedestal of sheer suspense and moments of terror.
About a giant man-eating shark, “Jaws” remains the best ever underwater drama, and in comparison Jon Turteltaub’s latest blue water ordeal, “The Meg,” pales.
The nail-biting thriller is not in the same league, despite Jason Statham’s exciting action sequences – which probably could be a major reason for Warner Brothers’ $44.5 million ticket sales in the film’s first weekend in the North American market.
Loosely based on the 1997 book, “Meg: A Novel of Deep Terror” by Steve Alten, the screen version has Statham playing an underwater rescue diver, Jonas Taylor, who is urgently summoned to save a group of scientists trapped in the Pacific Ocean.
Taylor’s former wife, Lori (Jessica McNamee) and two others, after a seemingly uneventful deep-sea exploration in a capsule, are attacked by a gigantic, 23-meter, pre-historic shark, Megalodon.
While Taylor succeeds in rescuing Lori and another scientist, the third dies. Back at the base station, the team discovers that the mammal had escaped from the depths after the capsule had breached a chemical cloud which had kept the dangerous creature imprisoned.
“The Meg” has more excitement to offer, and somewhat along the lines of “Jaws” we see a second giant shark attacking beach swimmers.
Many deaths follow, but somehow the movie does not create the kind of panic one would have expected in a shark-man conflict.
This is more like a B-grade horror movie to which summer crowds once flocked for air-conditioned comfort and a tub of popcorn.
Even if they ignored “Jaws” or other marine exploits such as “The Deep” (1977), a scintillating film based on another Benchley novel, the makers of “The Meg” would have seen the recent cliff-hanger, “Skyscraper.”
And these are far superior to “The Meg,” where the monster shark just lacks the killer bite.


The Six: Arab and Muslim models in New York

Updated 16 February 2019
0

The Six: Arab and Muslim models in New York

DUBAI: Arab and Muslim models took the runways by storm at New York Fashion Week, which closed on Sunday in the Big Apple.

Bella Hadid

The Palestinian-American model was a smash during the Michael Kors show, which paid tribute to 1970s fashion, rocking a sparkling black blazer with feathers on the sleeves.

Gigi Hadid

The hectic supermodel lifestyle didn’t get in the way of Bella’s sister, who was seen on the streets in her retro runway hairdo after walking the Michael Kors show.

Halima Aden

This Muslim model turned heads when she closed the Christian Cowan show with an oversized black and neon pantsuit and a chain-link rhinestone hijab.

Noor Tagouri

This Libyan-American journalist took her confidence to the next level when she decided to put down her pen and walk the runway for US brand Rebecca Minkoff.

Nora Attal

The British-Moroccan model kicked off the week in elegant leatherwork by French brand Longchamp and walked the runway for Brandon Maxwell.

Shanina Shaik

The Australian model, who was raised a Muslim and whose father is half-Saudi, modelled for Vietnamese designer Nguyen Cong Tri.