Saudi tourism authority retrieves more than 53,000 relics

The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) has undertaken registration of more than 53,000 historical artifacts and relics. (SPA)
Updated 14 August 2018
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Saudi tourism authority retrieves more than 53,000 relics

JEDDAH: The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) has undertaken registration of more than 53,000 historical artifacts and relics that it successfully managed to restore from inside and outside the Kingdom as part of the National Project for Digital Recording of Antiquities.
The project follows international standards for archaeological recording and archiving. It aims to document and store all historic sites, artifacts, historical monument and urban heritage buildings in a comprehensive national digital registry linked to a multidimensional digital map, which is compatible with modern GIS technologies and digital databases, maps, images and graphics.
Director-General of Archiving and Protecting Antiquities at the SCTH, Naif Al-Qannour, said: “The new digital recording project stores detailed information and reports about 32,000 artefacts retrieved from outside the Kingdom and 20,000 returned by citizens to the SCTH since Prince Sultan bin Salman, president of SCTH, launched the campaign to retrieve national artefacts in 2011.
“Some artifacts found their way outside Saudi Arabia through foreign travelers who moved them to other countries. One of the most famous artifacts is the Tayma Stone, which was discovered by Charles Huber and later displayed at the Louvre Museum in Paris.”
Al-Qannour also explained that many employees of foreign companies, especially in the oil industry, visited many parts of Saudi Arabia to study their geology and natural manifestations, collected the artifacts they found and took them to national museums in their home countries.
“Robbers of archaeological sites sometimes dig for archaeological treasures and achieve fast financial gains,” Al-Qannour said. “By doing so, they are destroying important archaeological evidence found in these sites, be it on land or in the sea.”
Al-Qannour said the SCTH will continue to work on retrieving and protecting artifacts and has released a red list of artifacts stolen from their sites inside Saudi Arabia and information about them to make them easier to identify. The SCTH has also announced handing financial rewards to those who return artifacts or report their loss or theft.
In 2011, Prince Sultan launched a campaign for retrieving national artifacts, including media and cultural programs and initiatives that aim to enlighten and inform citizens about the value of artifacts and the importance of returning them to the SCTH.
Recently, the commission released a list of 140 names of citizens and 18 Americans who returned artifacts, reported archaeological sites or cooperated with the SCTH in protecting the country’s cultural heritage between 2013 and 2017. This was to honor them during the First Antiquities Forum, which will be launched under the patronage of King Salman on Nov. 7 at the National Museum in Riyadh.


Saudi Aramco participates in annual India Energy Forum

Updated 22 min 38 sec ago
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Saudi Aramco participates in annual India Energy Forum

  • The annual event fosters national and international dialogue on opportunities, challenges and strategies to bring a new energy future for India

JEDDAH: Saudi Aramco has participated at the second India Energy Forum, hosted by CERAWeek, from Oct. 14-16.

The annual event fosters national and international dialogue on opportunities, challenges and strategies to bring a new energy future for India.

Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources and Saudi Aramco chairman, Khalid A. Al-Falih, took part in the Ministerial Dialogue on Oct. 15.

On the same day, Saudi Aramco Senior Vice President of Downstream Abdulaziz M. Al-Judaimi participated in a panel discussion titled: “Outlook for Refining and Petrochemicals.”

Al-Judaimi noted that relations between the Kingdom and India are growing more strategic. Adding that, being the largest supplier of energy to India, Saudi Aramco has always had a long-term commitment to the country’s energy security.

He said Saudi Aramco is tapping into India’s world-leading growth, by investing in its energy future as part of the company’s own downstream strategy.

He highlighted that the closer cooperation between Saudi Aramco and Indian energy entities was reflected in the partnership with ADNOC and the Ratnagiri Refinery & Petrochemicals Ltd (RRPCL) on the Ratnagiri mega-refinery and petrochemicals complex in Maharashta this year.

He noted that Saudi Aramco's spending on material services sourced from Indian suppliers has reached almost $2 billion in the past six years, and the opening of the Aramco Asia India office in 2017.

He also underscored Saudi Aramco’s role as a catalyst for helping grow India’s oil and gas sector, especially chemicals.

“Investing in India’s value chain from oil supply, marketing and refining to petrochemicals and lubricants is a key part of Saudi Aramco’s global downstream strategy,” said Al-Judaimi.

“Chemicals, especially, can enhance India’s energy sector, adding long-term value to the country’s resources, providing quality products for India’s and Asia’s rapidly expanding middle classes, and positioning India for accelerated economic growth as a manufacturing hub – all of which align with Saudi Aramco’s own intent to expand our global business portfolio and downstream network.”

Meanwhile, Saudi Aramco has participated in the 2nd Supply Chain and Logistics Conference organized by the Ministry of Transport in Riyadh.

Saudi Aramco’s Senior Vice President of Operations & Business Services Mohammad Saggaf has underscored the importance of creating a logistics hub in the Kingdom.

“The role played by the supply and logistics sector has gained increasing importance in both scope and value. The sector now represents about $4.3 trillion of the world’s economy. It impacts other industrial, commercial and service sectors and has adopted many new advanced technologies.”

He also revealed that Saudi Aramco’s partnership with the General Institution for Technical Trianing has led to the etsbalishement of more than 18 training academies as part of the company’s plan to train 300,000 trainees by 2030.