Saudi customs foil attempts to smuggle Captagon, shabu, alcohol

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Saudi Customs officials at King Abdulaziz International Airport prevented attempts to smuggle Captagon, methamphetamine and alcohol. (SPA)
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Saudi Customs officials at King Abdulaziz International Airport prevented attempts to smuggle Captigon, methamphetamine and alcohol. (SPA)
Updated 15 August 2018
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Saudi customs foil attempts to smuggle Captagon, shabu, alcohol

JEDDAH: Customs officials at King Abdulaziz International Airport prevented attempts to smuggle 24,875 tablets of Captagon and 3,061 kilograms of “Shabu,” also known as methamphetamine.
Authorities also seized 30 bottles of alcohol.
Customs Director General at King Abdulaziz International Airport, Bandar Al-Rahili, said five different smuggling attempts were thwarted during standard passenger screening inspections.
On one incoming flight to the Kingdom, a customs controller suspected a passenger’s travel bag and found a total of 16,555 Captagon tablets, also know as Fenethylline, wrapped in carbon-blue paper, packaged in newspapers and placed under clothing.
On a separate flight, 8,320 Captagon tablets were found hidden inside the base of a passenger’s bag.
Al-Rahili added that two other attempts were thwarted in the same way.
1,579kg of “Shabu” was seized in the first attempt and 1,482kg was seized in the second, both of which were hidden inside two bags containing sweets.
The 30 bottles of alcohol were found hidden inside four bags.
The necessary action has been taken.


US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

Updated 18 November 2018
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US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

  • A US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case
  • ‘The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts’

JEDDAH: The US government denied on Saturday it had reached a final conclusion over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi after a US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case. 
“Recent reports indicating that the US government has made a final conclusion are inaccurate,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said.
“There remain numerous unanswered questions with respect to the murder of Mr. Khashoggi. The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts,” she said.
“In the meantime, we will continue to consult Congress, and work with other nations to hold accountable those involved in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi.”

But President Donald Trump told reporters on Saturday that his administration would get “a very full report,” including who was responsible for Khashoggi’s death, on Monday or Tuesday.
The Washington Post published an article citing anonymous sources, who it says are close to the CIA which suggests the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman ordered the killing — something Saudi Arabia vehemently denies.
The Kingdom’s public prosecutor on Thursday released details of its investigation, saying the decision to kill the journalist was made by the head of a rogue mission during an attempt to repatriate him. The prosecutor is seeking the death penalty for five of the suspects. 
On Saturday, Donald Trump spoke with CIA Director Gina Haspel and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from Air Force One, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. 
Trump praised US relations with Saudi Arabia when he was asked about the case. Saudi Arabia is “a truly spectacular ally in terms of jobs and economic development,” the US president said.
Earlier, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US Prince Khalid bin Salman, strongly denied the Washington Post story, and said he did not tell Khashoggi to go to Turkey, as the report claimed. 
“I never talked to him by phone and certainly never suggested he go to Turkey for any reason. I ask the US government to release any information regarding this claim,” Prince Khalid said
Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States, was a columnist for the Post.
He was killed on Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after he went to get marriage documents.