Egypt allows fans back into stadiums for domestic games

Al-Ahly players celebrate during an Egyptian Premier League match in January, but the roar of fans has been absent since 2012. (AFP)
Updated 15 August 2018
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Egypt allows fans back into stadiums for domestic games

  • Crowds banned from stadiums since 2012 Port Said riots killed dozens
  • Supporters complained the Egyptian Premier league had become dull

CAIRO: Egypt will allow crowds back into football matches more than six years after dozens of people were killed, during rioting, at a match in Port Said.

Up to 5,000 fans will be allowed to attend Egyptian Premier League games from Sept. 1, Sports Minister Ashraf Sobhi told local media.

The move to allow partial crowds back into domestic matches follows demands from many supporters, who said the sport had become dull without spectators.

The Egyptian Football Association (EFA) made similar announcements in the past but failed to get approval from the interior ministry.

The crowd ban originally came into effect following the Port Said tragedy in February 2012 - Egypt’s worst football disaster.

More than 70 Al-Ahly fans were killed when massive riots swept through the stadium.

The ban was briefly lifted in February 2015 but was immediately re-instated after more than 20 Zamalek supporters were killed in a stampede, after security forces fired tear gas, before a league game against Enppi at Cairo’s Army Defence Stadium.

Fans were still allowed to attend continental games for Egyptian clubs, as well as matches featuring the national team.


Civilians prompt delay in assault on last Daesh enclave: Kurd-led forces

Updated 16 February 2019
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Civilians prompt delay in assault on last Daesh enclave: Kurd-led forces

  • The last few hundred Daesh militants, many of them foreigners, had surrendered in the past two days to the Syrian Democratic Forces

OMAR OIL FIELD, Syria: “Large numbers” of civilians remain inside the last Daesh group enclave in Syria prompting a fresh delay in a final advance, Kurdish-led forces said on Saturday.

“There are still civilians inside in large numbers,” US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces spokesman Adnan Afrin said on the day President Donald Trump said he expected to announce the end of the militants’ “caliphate.”

“We weren’t expecting this number, otherwise we wouldn’t have resumed the campaign four days ago. This is why it’s been delayed,” Afrin said.

A second SDF spokesman said that the diehard militants remained in control of the tiny enclave around the village of Baghouz on the north bank of the Euphrates river.

“The pocket inside Baghouz is still controlled by the Daesh group,” spokesman Mustefa Bali said.

“There are still civilians inside Baghouz and we are working on getting them out.”

Neither spokesman would comment on the timeline set by Trump for a US announcement that the “caliphate” had been eradicated.

“We have a lot of great announcements having to do with Syria and our success with the eradication of the caliphate and that will be announced over the next 24 hours,” Trump told reporters at around 1600 GMT on Thursday.