Multinational media delegation amazed by technologies and enormity of King Abdul Aziz Airport

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Multinational media delegation visits King Abdul Aziz Airport and looks over the advanced services provided for pilgrims. (Supplied)
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Multinational media delegation visits King Abdul Aziz Airport and looks over the advanced services provided for pilgrims. (Supplied)
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Multinational media delegation visits King Abdul Aziz Airport and looks over the advanced services provided for pilgrims. (Supplied)
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Multinational media delegation visits King Abdul Aziz Airport and looks over the advanced services provided for pilgrims. (Supplied)
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Multinational media delegation visits King Abdul Aziz Airport and looks over the advanced services provided for pilgrims. (Supplied)
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Multinational media delegation visits King Abdul Aziz Airport and looks over the advanced services provided for pilgrims. (Supplied)
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Multinational media delegation visits King Abdul Aziz Airport and looks over the advanced services provided for pilgrims. (Supplied)
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Multinational media delegation visits King Abdul Aziz Airport and looks over the advanced services provided for pilgrims. (Supplied)
Updated 15 August 2018
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Multinational media delegation amazed by technologies and enormity of King Abdul Aziz Airport

  • Local, Arab and foreign media channels and international news agencies are showing a big interest in covering the services provided by the Kingdom for its pilgrims
  • The delegation’s visit aimed to check the services and modern technologies as well as the services provided for pilgrims from their arrival until their departure after performing Hajj

JEDDAH: A multinational media delegation visited King Abdul Aziz International Airport in Jeddah on Tuesday to learn more about the services the state is providing for its guests, both pilgrims and travelers.
The delegation kicked off their visit with a tour around the new hall (hall 1), where they were received by Assistant Director-General of the airport Abed Al-Mohsen Al-Sheikh and a number of officials.
The delegation checked the modern services, equipment and techniques available at the new airport and were amazed by the technologies provided for travelers as well as the enormity of the airport, which reflects the Kingdom’s efforts in supporting the civil aviation industry.
The delegation continued their visit with a tour in the processing areas of arrival and departure and listened to an explanation about the airport’s great capacities and modern technologies adopted for the service of travelers.
The delegation also visited the Hajj halls at the airport and checked the new services provided for pilgrims in all the halls that receive tens of thousands of pilgrims every day heading to the holy sites to perform Hajj.
The tour also covered Hall 11, allocated to the Interior Ministry’s initiative “Makkah Road,” where the delegation listened to an explanation by the Commander of the Hajj Passports Force Col. Suleiman bin Mohammed Al-Yusuf about the services hall 11 offers pilgrims, to facilitate and optimize their Hajj experience. The delegation then moved to the Hajj and Umrah Ministry’s platform allocated to welcome pilgrims this year.
At the end of the tour, the delegation praised the airport’s development and speed in completing traveling procedures in a record time, noting King Salman and the crown prince’s great efforts to serve pilgrims and provide the best services and care.
For his part, Turki Al-Thieb, director-general of the public relations and information at the airport, said the delegation included a big number of international media representatives from Arab and European countries as well as West Asia and Africa.
The delegation’s visit aimed to check the services and modern technologies as well as the services provided for pilgrims from their arrival until their departure after performing Hajj, within a comprehensive system of services provided by more than 27 governmental and non-governmental bodies and supervised by the Civil Aviation Authority, represented by the airport’s administration.
Al-Thieb said the delegationэs members looked over the services provided at the Hajj halls for pilgrims and the speed of completing Hajj procedures in less than 20 minutes. These services are carried out under the directive of King Salman and his crown prince to serve pilgrims from the moment they arrive to perform Hajj until the moment they head back to their countries safe and sound.
Local, Arab and foreign media channels and international news agencies are showing a big interest in covering the services provided by the Kingdom for its pilgrims at King Abdul Aziz International Airport, where more than 344 permits have been issued so far, allowing local and international media in the Hajj halls.


How new criminal laws threaten Nepal journalism

A Nepalese roadside vendor reads the news in Kathmandu, Nepal, Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (AP)
Updated 24 September 2018
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How new criminal laws threaten Nepal journalism

  • The codes prohibit publishing private information, including of officials, ban recording without permission and require photographers to obtain permits in order to take pictures and sell and publish them

KATMANDU, Nepal: Journalists in Nepal are demanding changes to new criminal and civil codes they say undermine freedom of speech and expression.
The laws that took effect last month are general codes of conduct that apply to all citizens of Nepal, but press freedom groups say harsher sentences for libel and privacy violations are having a chilling effect on journalists in the small Himalayan country. Here are some details:
WHY THE NEW LAWS CAME ABOUT
Nepal’s new civil and criminal codes are the result of a new constitution adopted in 2015. Nepalese lawmakers had three years to design a set of laws that prescribe how the constitution should be interpreted. The codes cover everything from stipulating the legal age of marriage to enshrining property rights and describe how each civil violation or crime can be punished.
WHY THEY ARE CONTROVERSIAL
The constitution guarantees freedom of speech and expression. But provisions of the new codes appear to limit these freedoms, according to the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists. “Nepal’s new criminal code marks a giant step backward for press freedom,” program coordinator Steven Butler said in a statement. For example, the codes make criticizing the president or members of Parliament criminal acts. The codes also prohibit publishing private information, including of officials, ban recording without permission and require photographers to obtain permits in order to take pictures and sell and publish them. The codes say that authorities can detain suspects for up to 40 days while investigating criminal charges. “Now journalists will be first detained and treated like murder suspects even before they are tried or given a chance to clarify,” said Ramesh Bistra, general secretary of the Federation of Nepalese Journalists, which has vowed to fight for the codes to be amended. The codes also ban satire, which in Nepal has been a prominent feature in the press and a popular form of protest throughout the country’s changing forms of government — from monarchy to autocratic rule to constitutional monarchy to the republic established in 2007.
CHILLING EFFECT
Press freedom groups say the language of the laws is broad enough to be used as a tool to attack journalists and deter them from doing their work. The four sections on privacy and defamation decree sentences of up to three years in prison and $260 in fines. Previously, journalists could be fined up to $217 for libel. “These new laws have created an environment of fear for the journalists and more and more of them are now practicing self-censorship,” said Taranath Dahal, who heads the Freedom Forum, a Nepal-based media rights group.
GOVERNMENT’S RESPONSE
In response to journalists’ protests, the Nepalese government has formed a committee to recommend changes to the codes’ language. This committee, with representatives from several media rights groups and unions, has been given 45 days to come up with recommendations. The government, however, is not obliged to follow them. Even if the government accepts the changes, lawmakers would have to draft amendments, which would then have to be debated in Parliament before changes could be made. This could take months if not years in Nepal. Until then, the controversial new codes remain in effect.