Did woman detained in Dubai airport offer Botox treatments without license?

Image from her Dr Ellie Holman Aesthetics Facebook page (Courtesy of social media)
Updated 15 August 2018
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Did woman detained in Dubai airport offer Botox treatments without license?

  • More scandal surrounds the woman arrested in Dubai airport, this time over Botox treatments
  • The 44-year-old has a Facebook page advertising Botox treatments

DUBAI: In a scandal that captured the world’s imagination – quite literally in the case of some press – the Swedish dentist deported from the UAE for taking photos of an airport immigration officer, now stands accused of offering cosmetic procedures without the correct paperwork from Dubai authorities.

Ellie Holman, 44, hit the headlines when she was arrested at passport control in Dubai airport – she claimed she was detained because she had drunk a glass of wine on an Emirates flight – but it was later revealed she had been abusive towards an immigration officer and took his photograph.

Now it has been revealed that during previous visits to Dubai, Holman had advertised Botox injections – as well as other procedures – according to her own social media posts – UAE daily The National reported.

According to the newspaper, Holman runs a clinic in Sevenoaks, Kent, under the name Dr Ellie Holman Aesthetics.

Her advertising states that the clinic offers “botox and filler treatments,” adding that Holman is a “qualified dental surgeon” with more than “13 years experience in aesthetic medicine.”

And on a Facebook page for her practice, there are various mentions of procedures carried out in Dubai - some of the posts include the hashtag “dubaiclinicstories.”

Image from her Dr Ellie Holman Aesthetics Facebook page (Courtesy of social media)

In one post from May 26, 2017, highlighted by the report, are the words “Dubai we are coming for you.”

The post also included a series of hashtags including “dubaiclinic” and “drellieholmandubai.”

A screengrab of  a post on her "Dr Ellie Holman Aesthetics" Facebook page appearing to suggest she was offering work in Dubai

Since her arrest there have been a number of posts on a Facebook group for British expats, including one claiming she had been “operating ... in Dubai for years.”

According to The National, Holman appears not to have the necessary registration to work as a medical professional in the UAE.

Under Dubai Health Authority regulations, it is stated that the only people allowed to carry out “fillers and botulinum toxin injections [botox]” are DHA registered medical consultants and specialist physicians.

Otherwise, it adds, “non-surgical cosmetic services will be provided in DHA-licensed facilities.”

But according to the report Holman is not listed in the online directory of the DHA.

Holman’s, possibly unintended, rise to stardom happened following her arrest at Dubai airport.

She claimed it was because she drank a complimentary glass of wine on an Emirates flight and that she feared for her safety when she was locked up in a Dubai jail.

The British press leapt on the story, eager for an opportunity to once again slam Dubai, but the UAE government revealed in a statement what had really happened.

It turned out that Iranian-born mother-of-three, Holman, had attempted to enter the UAE on her expired Swedish passport, before than trying to use her Iranian passport without a visa.

When she was told of the costs and time it would involve she responded “angrily.”

A statement issued by the Dubai attorney explained: “Ms. Holman refused angrily due to the additional payment fees the process would require, and proceeded to verbally insult the immigration officer and take photos of the officer via her phone,” a statement from Al-Humaidan said.

Holman has denied she was abusive and says she was detained for days.


Facebook accused of discrimination with job ad targeting

Updated 19 September 2018
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Facebook accused of discrimination with job ad targeting

  • It charges that job ads on Facebook targeted male users only
  • Facebook lets advertisers target ads on the basis of gender and age, which is against the law in America

WASHINGTON: A complaint has been filed with the US government accusing Facebook and 10 other companies of using the platform’s job ad targeting system to discriminate on the basis of gender.
The complaint was announced Tuesday by the American Civil Liberties Union, a union called the Communications Workers of America and a labor law firm, on behalf of three female job seekers and a group of “thousands” of members represented by the union.
It charges that job ads on Facebook targeted male users only. It also alleges that most of the listings were for jobs in male-dominated fields, so women and non-binary users were excluded from seeing these ads.
Facebook lets advertisers target ads on the basis of gender and age, which is against the law in America, the complaint reads.
“I shouldn’t be shut out of the chance to hear about a job opportunity just because I am a woman,” said Bobbi Spees, one of the three women named in the complaint.
Facebook spokesman Joe Osborne said in a statement to CNNMoney that there is no place for discrimination on Facebook.
“It’s strictly prohibited in our policies, and over the past year we’ve strengthened our systems to further protect against misuse,” Osborne said.
Facebook will defend itself once it has reviewed the complaint, he added.
The ACLU noted that online platforms such as Facebook are generally not liable for content published by others.
“But in this case, Facebook is doing much more than merely publishing content created by others,” the advocacy group argued.
“It has built the architecture for this discriminatory marketing framework, enabled and encouraged advertisers to use it, and delivered the gender-based ads according to employers’ sex-based preferences.”
Last month the US Department of Housing and Urban Development accused Facebook of breaking the law by letting landlords and home sellers use its ad-targeting system to discriminate against potential buyers or tenants.
Facebook responded by cutting more than 5,000 ad-targeting options to prevent advertisers from discriminating on the basis of traits such as religion or race.