FaceOf: Dr. Ahmad Al-Tayeb,  Imam of Al-Azhar

Sheikh Ahmad Al-Tayeb served as Egypt's grand mufti from March 2002 until September 2003.
Updated 15 August 2018
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FaceOf: Dr. Ahmad Al-Tayeb,  Imam of Al-Azhar

Dr. Ahmad Al-Tayeb is the current imam of Al-Azhar, appointed by the former Egyptian president, Hosni Mubarak, in 2010. 

Al-Tayeb met the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) Secretary-General Dr. Yousef Al-Othaimeen on Tuesday in Cairo. They reviewed current Islamic issues and discussed ways to strengthen Islamic cooperation in countering terrorism and promoting world peace. 

Al-Othaimeen also met with Egypt’s Foreign Minister Saleh Shukry and discussed the latest regional developments and how to deal with the crises in several Islamic countries.

Al-Tayeb was born in 1946 in Al-Kurna village in the governorate of Luxor. He received his basic education at Al-Azhar school, where he memorized and studied the Qur’an and Islamic major works and texts. 

He joined the college of Fundamentals of Religion in Cairo and graduated from the theology and philosophy department in 1969. He obtained his master’s and doctorate degrees from the same department.

He speaks English and French languages fluently, and he has translated several books from French to Arabic. 

Al-Tayeb is a hereditary Sufi shaykh from Upper Egypt and has expressed support for a global Sufi league.

Al-Tayeb began his academic career as a teaching assistant in the department of theology and philosophy at Al-Azhar University in 1969. 

He became a lecturer in 1977 and an associate professor in 1982. Since January 1988, he had been a professor of philosophy at Al-Azhar University.

In addition to his academic career, Al-Tayeb served as the Grand Mufti of the Arab Republic of Egypt from March 2002 until September 2003. He became president of Al-Azhar University in September 2003 until he was appointed in 2010 as Grand Imam of Al-Azhar.


Rebel Wilson loses bid to keep most of $3.4 million defamation payout

Updated 16 November 2018
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Rebel Wilson loses bid to keep most of $3.4 million defamation payout

  • The actress had sued Woman’s Day magazine last year over a series of articles in 2015
  • ‘The whole reason for bringing this case is that I wanted to stand up to a bully, which is Bauer Media’

SYDNEY: Rebel Wilson said she was glad she’d stood up to “a bully” despite losing her bid Friday to keep most of the record payout awarded to her in her defamation case against an Australian magazine.
The actress had sued Woman’s Day magazine last year over a series of articles in 2015 that she said had painted her as someone who’d lied about her real name, age and childhood in order to make it in Hollywood.
The Supreme Court of Victoria state awarded her an Australian-record payout of $3.4 million (A$4.7 million) after a jury concluded she’d missed out on film roles because of the articles. Wilson had sought $5 million in damages.
But this June the amount was reduced by 90 percent after the magazine’s publishers, Bauer Media, appealed. Victoria’s Court of Appeal said Wilson could not prove economic loss, or that she’d missed out on film contracts as a result of the articles. The court ordered the actress to pay back almost $3 million, and 80 percent of Bauer’s legal costs.
Wilson’s lawyers on Friday sought leave to appeal against the reduction in the High Court — Australia’s highest judicial body — but the application was refused.
“In our opinion there are insufficient prospects that an appeal will succeed,” Justice Virginia Bell said at the court in the national capital, Canberra.
The magazine publisher welcomed the decision. “Bauer Media is invested in its Australian business now more than ever,” Bauer chief executive Paul Dykzeul said in a statement. “Our audience trust our content and our writers and they love our iconic brands like Woman’s Day and Australian Women’s Weekly.”
Wilson, who sat in the front row of the public gallery during the brief hearing, said outside the court she was glad the process had been brought to an end.
“This has been a long fight and a long journey in the courts, but the great thing about today is that it brings it to a definitive end,” she told reporters.
“The whole reason for bringing this case is that I wanted to stand up to a bully, which is Bauer Media.”
Wilson said she was proud of herself for “seeing it out right to the bitter end,” and that she was glad the initial jury had “restored my reputation.”
“Today was just about a small point of special damages and for me it was never about the money, it was about standing up to a bully and I’ve done that.”
Wilson is a native Australian best known for her Hollywood roles in the “Pitch Perfect” films and “Bridesmaids.”