Australian senator condemned for advocating white-only immigration policy

Senator Fraser Anning makes his maiden speech at Parliament House in Canberra, in which he advocated reviving a white-only immigration policy and called for a vote on which migrants to admit into Australia. (Reuters)
Updated 16 August 2018
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Australian senator condemned for advocating white-only immigration policy

  • Fraser Anning called for a complete ban on Muslim immigration and linked Muslim communities to terrorism and being on welfare programs
  • Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and opposition Labor leader Bill Shorten gave passionate Parliament speeches opposing Anning’s comments

CANBERRA, Australia: An Australian senator is being condemned for his speech in Parliament advocating reviving a white-only immigration policy and using the term “final solution” in calling for a vote on which migrants to admit into the country.
Fraser Anning has refused to apologize for the content of his first upper house speech. But politicians across the spectrum were united in denouncing his words. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and opposition Labor leader Bill Shorten gave passionate Parliament speeches Wednesday opposing Anning’s comments.
Anning also called for a complete ban on Muslim immigration and linked Muslim communities to terrorism and being on welfare programs. Turnbull said in his own speech, “Those who try to demonize Muslims because of the crimes of a tiny minority are only helping the terrorists.”
A member of the minor Katter’s Australian Party, Anning was unapologetic about using the same phrase Nazi leaders used in planning the Holocaust during World War II.
“The final solution to the immigration problem is, of course, a popular vote,” Anning said in his Senate speech.
He claimed to be simply referring to the “ultimate solution” to a political problem and said people who were offended took the two words out of context.
Shorten said those two words evoke trauma and come from history’s darkest moments. “Two words would speak for the brutalization and murder of millions. Two words that evoke fear and grief and trauma and loss,” Shorten said.
He said most Australians did not want to see the country go back to 1958 and moved a unanimous motion praising the dismantling of discriminatory immigration policies over several decades.


New Zealand envoy headed to Turkey to ‘confront’ Erdogan’s mosque shooting comments

Updated 12 min 11 sec ago
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New Zealand envoy headed to Turkey to ‘confront’ Erdogan’s mosque shooting comments

  • President Tayyip Erdogan said Turkey would make the suspected attacker pay if New Zealand did not
  • His comments came at a campaign rally that included video footage of the shootings

SYDNEY: New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said on Wednesday Foreign Minister Winston Peters will travel to Turkey to “confront” comments made by Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan on the killing of at least 50 people at mosques in Christchurch.
Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, a suspected white supremacist, was charged with murder on Saturday after a lone gunman opened fire at the two mosques during Friday prayers.
Erdogan — who is seeking to drum up support for his Islamist-rooted AK Party in March 31 local elections — said Turkey would make the suspected attacker pay if New Zealand did not.
The comments came at a campaign rally that included video footage of the shootings which the alleged gunman had broadcast on Facebook.
Ardern said Peters would seek urgent clarification.
“Our deputy prime minister will be confronting those comments in Turkey,” Ardern told reporters in Christchurch. “He is going there to set the record straight, face-to-face.”
Peters had earlier condemned the airing of footage of the shooting, which he said could endanger New Zealanders abroad.
Despite Peters’ intervention, an extract from Tarrant’s alleged manifesto was flashed up on a screen at Erdogan’s rally again on Tuesday, along with footage of the gunman entering one of the mosques and shooting as he approached the door.
Meanwhile, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said he summoned Turkey’s ambassador for a meeting, during which he demanded Erdogan’s comments be removed from Turkey’s state broadcaster.
“I will wait to see what the response is from the Turkish government before taking further action, but I can tell you that all options are on the table,” Morrison told reporters in Canberra.
Morrison said Australia’s ambassador to Turkey will on Wednesday meet with the members of Erdogan’s government.
Morrison said Canberra is also reconsidering its travel advice for Australians planning trips to Turkey.
Relations between Turkey, New Zealand and Australia have generally been good. Thousands of Australians and New Zealanders travel each year to Turkey for war memorial services.
Just over a century ago, thousands of soldiers from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) struggled ashore on a narrow beach at Gallipoli during an ill-fated campaign that would claim more than 130,000 lives.
The area has become a site of pilgrimage for visitors who honor their nations’ fallen in graveyards halfway around the world on ANZAC Day every April 25.