DP World first-half profit dips 2.1%

DP World said it posted a net profit attributable to owners of the company of $593 million in the first half of the year. (Reuters)
Updated 16 August 2018
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DP World first-half profit dips 2.1%

  • ‘The near-term trade outlook remains uncertain with recent changes in trade policies and geopolitical headwinds in some regions continuing to pose uncertainty to the container market’
  • DP World recently won a 30-year concession for the management and development of a port project at Banana in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

DUBAI: DP World, one of the world’s biggest port operators, posted a 2.1 percent drop in first-half net profit on Thursday, and cautioned about geopolitical risks and recent changes to trade policies.
US President Donald Trump is taking a more aggressive, protectionist posture on trade than his recent predecessors, sparking retaliatory measures from other countries such as China.
“The near-term trade outlook remains uncertain with recent changes in trade policies and geopolitical headwinds in some regions continuing to pose uncertainty to the container market,” said the company’s chairman and chief executive, Sultan Ahmed bin Sulayem.
“However, the robust financial performance of the first six months also leaves us well placed for 2018 and we expect to see increased contributions from our recent investments in the second half of the year,” he said in a statement.
Lower export orders and car sales are likely to slow world trade growth in the third quarter, the World Trade Organization said recently, as a global tariff crusade by Trump to protect American jobs begins to bite.
DP World said it posted a net profit attributable to owners of the company of $593 million in the first half of the year, compared to $606 million during the same period a year earlier.
Cash from operating activities was recorded at $979 million in the first half, slightly lower than $1.0 billion a year earlier.
The port operator said capital expenditure guidance for 2018 remains unchanged at up to $1.4 billion with investments planned in the United Arab Emirates, Posorja (Ecuador), Berbera (Somaliland), Sokhna (Egypt) and London Gateway.
DP World recently won a 30-year concession for the management and development of a port project at Banana in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which currently has no direct deep-sea port despite being Africa’s third-most populous country.


US in criminal probe of China's Huawei

Updated 17 January 2019
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US in criminal probe of China's Huawei

  • The Wall Street Journal said the US justice department is looking into allegations of theft of trade secrets from Huawei's US business partners
  • Huawei forcefully denied accusations that his firm engaged in espionage on behalf of the Chinese government

WASHINGTON: US authorities are in the "advanced" stages of a criminal probe that could result in an indictment of Chinese technology giant Huawei, a report said Wednesday.
The Wall Street Journal, citing anonymous sources, said the Department of Justice is looking into allegations of theft of trade secrets from Huawei's US business partners, including a T-Mobile robotic device used to test smartphones.
Huawei and the Department of Justice declined to comment on the media report.
However, Huawei noted that "Huawei and T-Mobile settled their disputes in 2017 following a US jury verdict finding neither damage, unjust enrichment nor willful and malicious conduct by Huawei in T-Mobile's trade secret claim."
The move would further escalate tensions between the US and China after the arrest last year in Canada of Huawei's chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who is the daughter of the company founder.
The case of Meng, under house arrest awaiting proceedings, has inflamed US-China and Canada-China relations.
Two Canadians have been detained in China since Meng's arrest and a third has been sentenced to death on drug trafficking charges -- moves observers see as attempts by Beijing to pressure Ottawa over her case.
Huawei, the second-largest global smartphone maker and biggest producer of telecommunications equipment, has for years been under scrutiny in the US over purported links to the Chinese government.
Huawei's reclusive founder Ren Zhengfei, in a rare media interview Tuesday, forcefully denied accusations that his firm engaged in espionage on behalf of the Chinese government.
The tensions come amid a backdrop of President Donald Trump's efforts to get more manufacturing on US soil and slap hefty tariffs on Chinese goods for what he claims are unfair trade practices by Beijing.
In a related move, lawmakers introduced a bill to ban the export of American parts and components to Chinese telecom companies that are in violation of US export control or sanctions laws -- with Huawei and fellow Chinese firm ZTE the likely targets.
"Huawei is effectively an intelligence-gathering arm of the Chinese Communist Party whose founder and CEO was an engineer for the People's Liberation Army," said Republican Senator Tom Cotton, one of the bill's sponsors.
Democratic Senator Chris Van Hollen said in the same statement: "Huawei and ZTE are two sides of the same coin. Both companies have repeatedly violated US laws, represent a significant risk to American national security interests and need to be held accountable."
Last year, Trump reached a deal with ZTE that eases tough financial penalties on the firm for helping Iran and North Korea evade American sanctions.
Trump said his decision in May to spare ZTE came following an appeal by Chinese President Xi Jinping to help save Chinese jobs.