Ecuador tightens entry requirements as Venezuelan migration swells

Venezuelan migrants rest at a makeshift tent in Quito, Ecuador, on Aug. 9, 2018. Ecuador's government declared an immigration emergency due to the arrival of thousands of Venezuelans in three border provinces and will provide humanitarian assistance to the Venezuelan migrants that continue to arrive. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
Updated 17 August 2018
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Ecuador tightens entry requirements as Venezuelan migration swells

  • Quito declared a state of emergency in three provinces this month after a spike in Venezuelan migrants crossing the Ecuadorean-Colombian border high in the Andean mountains
  • Members of the Andean Community have an existing agreement that allow citizens to cross borders between member countries with only their national ID cards

QUITO: Ecuador on Thursday said that all foreigners entering the country would need a passport from Saturday, an apparent attempt to curb rising numbers of Venezuelan migrants fleeing their homeland.
Members of the Andean Community — which includes Venezuela and Ecuador — have an existing agreement that allow citizens to cross borders between member countries with only their national ID cards. That has been a significant advantage for Venezuelan migrants, who struggle to obtain passports amid chronic shortages.
“As of this Saturday the government will require that anyone entering Ecuador present his or her passport,” said Interior Minister Mauro Toscanini on Thursday.
He did not specify if the measure was aimed at Venezuelan migration but added that Ecuador wants Venezuela to make efforts so “that its citizens do not need to go through the very difficult situation of having to leave their country.” The ministry declined further comment.
Venezuelan migrants have been taking days-long bus rides across South America, often crossing Ecuador on their way south to Peru or Chile, because they cannot afford flights on a minimum wage that adds up to a few US dollars a month.
Quito declared a state of emergency in three provinces this month after a spike in Venezuelan migrants crossing the Ecuadorean-Colombian border high in the Andean mountains. Authorities said up to 4,500 Venezuelans were crossing daily, compared with around 500 to 1,000 previously.
Ecuador’s President Lenin Moreno is left-wing like his Venezuelan counterpart Nicolas Maduro, but he has distanced himself from Caracas since taking office last year. The migration wave has also soured public opinion toward Venezuela in the country of some 16 million.
The Ecuadorean government does not provide data on the total number of Venezuelans living in the country, but an official at the Foreign Ministry told local radio that some 600,000 Venezuelans had entered the country so far this year, with around 109,000 staying on.
Venezuelans begging or selling knickknacks are now a common sight in Quito. And as in much of Latin America, some locals fret that desperate Venezuelans are undercutting the job market.


More than 100 China experts urge China to release Canadians

In this file photo an undated picture released on December 11, 2018 in Washington by the International Crisis Group shows former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig. (AFP)
Updated 33 min 7 sec ago
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More than 100 China experts urge China to release Canadians

  • More than 20 diplomats from seven countries and more than 100 scholars and academics from 19 countries signed

TORONTO: More than 100 academics and former diplomats are calling on China to release two Canadians who have been detained in apparent retaliation for the arrest of a top Chinese tech executive in Canada.
The letter by a wide array of China experts from around the world is addressed to Chinese President Xi Jinping. It says the arrests of the two Canadians sends a worrisome signal to those who work in policy and research in China.
China detained former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig and Canadian entrepreneur Michael Spavor on Dec. 10 in an apparent attempt to pressure Canada to release Chinese executive Meng Wanzhou, who was arrested Dec. 1 at the request of US authorities.
Meng is the chief financial officer of the Chinese tech giant Huawei and the daughter of its founder. The US wants her extradited to face charges that she committed fraud by misleading banks about Huawei’s business dealings in Iran.
The letter, released Monday, notes Kovrig is a former diplomat who was working as an expert on Asia for the International Crisis Group think tank. It notes that Spavor devoted his time to building relationships between North Korea and China, Canada and United States.
It praises Kovrig and Spavor as bridge-builders between China and the world and said their arrests make writers “more cautious” about traveling to China.
“Meetings and exchanges are the foundation of serious research and diplomacy around the world, including for Chinese scholars and diplomats,” the letter says. “Kovrig and Spavor’s detentions send a message that this kind of constructive work is unwelcome and even risky in China.”
The letter said the arrests will lead to “less dialogue and greater distrust, and undermine efforts to manage disagreements and identify common ground. Both China and the rest of the world will be worse off as a result.”
More than 20 diplomats from seven countries and more than 100 scholars and academics from 19 countries signed.
Guy Saint-Jacques, a former Canadian ambassador to China, signed the letter and noted it comes as Canada is working to rally international support for the case.
“It will be noticed in Beijing and I hope that it will make clear for them that the arrests of Kovrig and Spavor are not only a China-Canada problem but it’s also having an impact on the image of and reputation of China,” Saint-Jacques said. “It’s an impressive list.”
The signatories include former British Foreign Secretary Malcolm Rifkind, former Australian Foreign Minister Gareth Evans and Chris Patten, former British governor of Hong Kong. Two former US ambassadors to China, Gary Locke and Winston Lord, also signed.
David Mulroney, another former Canadian ambassador to China, said the letter is significant because it shows the international breadth of support for the two men.
“This isn’t simply a Canada-China dispute,” Mulroney said. “A lot of serious people, including many who have spent years working in China, are worried about how it is closing itself off, and punishing those who seek to understand and interpret it for others.”
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he encourages friends and allies around the world to point out that all countries should stand up for the rule of law.