Woman refuses flood rescue unless her 25 dogs go too

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An Indian poultry farmer and his friends take out a batch of hens to a safer place at Aluva in Ernakulam district, in the Indian state of Kerala on August 17, 2018. (AFP)
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An aerial view shows partially submerged houses at a flooded area in the southern state of Kerala, India, August 17, 2018. (REUTERS)
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Volunteering members of the public help sort flood relief material at the District Tourism Promotion Council (DTPC), in Kozhikode district, about 385 km north of Trivandrum, in the south Indian state of Kerala, on August 17, 2018. (AFP)
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People help a woman disembark from an Indian Navy helicopter at a relief camp after being rescued from a flooded area in the southern state of Kerala, India, August 17, 2018. (REUTERS)
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An aerial view shows partially submerged houses at a flooded area in the southern state of Kerala, India, August 17, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 19 August 2018
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Woman refuses flood rescue unless her 25 dogs go too

  • Dozens of military and coast guard helicopters took troops to high risk areas seeking people trapped on the roofs of submerged buildings
  • One a heavily pregnant woman Sajita Jabeel, 25, gave birth just after her rescue

KOCHI, India: A woman refused to leave her flooded house in India’s Kerala state without her 25 dogs, a rescuer said Saturday, as the death toll continued to rise.
The dogs were found cowering on beds in the flooded house with water rising when an animal welfare group arrived for a last-gasp rescue, said Sally Varma of Humane Society International.
The woman, who uses only one name Sunitha, was found by rescuers in Thrissur, one of the districts worst hit by floods in Kerala that have left at least 324 dead.
But she refused to leave her house unless her dogs, all strays or abandoned pets, were taken too, Varma told AFP.
“She sent back volunteers and rescue officials because they said they could not evacuate her dogs.
“She was just not willing to leave her dogs behind. She then managed to get in touch with us,” Varma added.
“When the rescue team reached her house, it was completely flooded and the dogs were huddled on beds.”
Sunitha, her husband and the dogs are now staying at a special shelter as the relief camps set up for the disaster refused animals.
Varma said she has started a fundraiser for Sunitha and her pets so a kennel could be built at her home after the floods recede.


Missing ‘Picasso’ thought found in Romania a hoax: report

In this Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012 file photo, the empty space where Henri Matisse' painting "La Liseuse en Blanc et Jaune" was hanging, right, is seen next to a painting by Maurice Denis, center, and Pierre Bonnard, left, at Kunsthal museum in Rotterdam, Netherlands. (AP)
Updated 19 November 2018
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Missing ‘Picasso’ thought found in Romania a hoax: report

  • Romanian authorities said that it “might be” Picasso’s painting, which is estimated to be worth 800,000 euros ($915,000)

THE HAGUE: A writer who thought she had found a masterpiece by Pablo Picasso stolen in an infamous art heist six years ago said Sunday she was the victim of a “publicity stunt,” the NOS Dutch public newscaster reported.
Picasso’s “Harlequin Head” was one of seven celebrated paintings stolen from the Kunsthal Museum in Rotterdam, The Netherlands in 2012 during a daring robbery local media dubbed “the theft of the century.”
The artworks have not been seen since.
Around 10 days ago, Mira Feticu, a Dutch writer of Romanian origin who wrote a novel based on the heist, was sent an anonymous letter.
“I received a letter in Romanian with instructions regarding the place where the painting was hidden,” she told AFP.
The instructions led her to a forest in eastern Romania where she dug up an artwork.
Romanian authorities, who received the canvas on Saturday night, said that it “might be” Picasso’s painting, which is estimated to be worth 800,000 euros ($915,000). Experts were checking whether it was authentic.
However on Sunday night Feticu told NOS that she was the victim of a performance by two Belgian directors in Antwerp.
Feticu said she received an email from the Belgian duo explaining that the letter was part of a project called “True Copy” dedicated to the notorious Dutch forger Geert Jan Jansen, whose fakes flooded the art collections of Europe and beyond until he was caught in 1994.
“Part of this performance was prepared in silence in the course of the past few months, with a view to bringing back Picasso’s ‘Tete d’Arlequin’,” the directors wrote on their website.
Their production company “currently wishes to abstain from any comment” because it first wants to speak Fetuci, the statement said.
“We will be back with more details on this issue within the next few days.”