What We Are Reading Today: Optimal Transport Methods in Economics

Updated 19 August 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Optimal Transport Methods in Economics

Optimal Transport Methods in Economics is the first textbook on the subject written especially for students and researchers in economics.
Optimal transport theory is used widely to solve problems in mathematics and some areas of the sciences, but it can also be used to understand a range of problems in applied economics, such as the matching between job seekers and jobs, the determinants of real estate prices, and the formation of matrimonial unions.
This is the first text to develop clear applications of optimal transport to economic modeling, statistics, and econometrics, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. It covers the basic results of the theory as well as their relations to linear programming, network flow problems, convex analysis, and computational geometry.
Applications include discrete choice models, models of differential demand, and quantile-based statistical estimation methods, as well as asset pricing models.
Authoritative and accessible, Optimal Transport Methods in Economics also features numerous exercises throughout that help you develop your mathematical agility, deepen your computational skills, and strengthen your economic intuition.


What We Are Reading Today: The Manhattan Nobody Knows

Updated 16 November 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Manhattan Nobody Knows

Author: William B. Helmreich

Bill Helmreich walked every block of New York City — 6,000 miles in all — to write the award-winning The New York Nobody Knows. Now he has re-walked most of Manhattan — 721 miles — to write this new, one-of-a-kind walking guide to the heart of one of the world’s greatest cities.
Drawing on hundreds of conversations he had with residents during his block-by-block journey, The Manhattan Nobody Knows captures the unique magic and excitement of the island and highlights hundreds of facts, places, and points of interest that you won’t find in any other guide.
The guide covers every one of Manhattan’s 31 distinct neighborhoods, from Marble Hill to the Financial District, providing a colorful portrait of each area’s most interesting, unusual, and unfamiliar people, places, and things.
Along the way you will be introduced to an elderly Inwood man who lives in a cave; a Greenwich Village townhouse where Weathermen terrorists set up a bomb factory; a Harlem apartment building whose residents included W.E.B. DuBois and Thurgood Marshall; a tiny community garden attached to the Lincoln Tunnel.