Ever wondered how they clean the floor around the Kaaba during Hajj? Quickly

1 / 5
Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims will circumambulate the Kaaba during Hajj, so how do they clean it? (AFP)
2 / 5
Machineries and equipment used to clean the Harram. (@ReasahAlharmain)
3 / 5
Machineries and equipment used to clean the Harram. (@ReasahAlharmain)
4 / 5
Machineries and equipment used to clean the Harram. (@ReasahAlharmain)
5 / 5
Machineries and equipment used to clean the Harram. (@ReasahAlharmain)
Updated 19 August 2018
0

Ever wondered how they clean the floor around the Kaaba during Hajj? Quickly

  • Hundreds of thousands of people walk around the Kaaba during Hajj
  • The process of cleaning the floor is a well rehearsed task that takes minutes

DUBAI: With millions of people currently attending Makkah as they perform the Hajj pilgrimage, which includes circumambulating the Kaaba, it is no wonder that things need to be cleaned.

This sped-up video footage, that has been shared on social media, shows how teams of cleaners enter the Mataf (the circumambulation area around the Kaaba), while a line of security stop the pilgrims entering the area which is being cleaned with a long line of rope.  

The process is well rehearsed, so the teams of cleaners take little time to ensure the area is ready in a short time, so that pilgrims can continue.

Here’s the video:

 


KSA’s anti-graft agency Nazaha reports rise in corruption complaints

Nazaha has completed investigations into 59 percent of the complaints, with 4.4 percent referred to the Control and Investigation Board. (SPA)
Updated 19 February 2019
0

KSA’s anti-graft agency Nazaha reports rise in corruption complaints

  • Nazaha announced the statistics as part of the National Strategy for the Protection of Integrity and Combating Corruption and Vision 2030

JEDDAH: Complaints to the Saudi National Anti-Corruption Commission, Nazaha, have risen by 50 percent in a single year amid increasing efforts to combat financial and administrative misconduct in the Kingdom.
Nazaha received 15,591 reports in 2018 compared with 10,402 the previous year, according to statistics released by the commission.
Financial and administrative corruption cases made up the bulk of the reports.
Nazaha has completed investigations into 59 percent of the complaints, with 4.4 percent referred to the Control and Investigation Board and 3.37 percent to the Kingdom’s Presidency of State Security.
The commission’s smartphone app received 29 percent of the reports, followed by the website at 23.6 percent, while 19.2 percent of the complaints were made in person at Nazaha’s branches. AN Jeddah
Nazaha announced the statistics as part of the National Strategy for the Protection of Integrity and Combating Corruption and Vision 2030.