Hot air balloons take flight over Austria for world championship

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Competitors approach a target during the FAI World Hot Air Balloon Championship near Gross-Siegharts, Austria on Monday, August 20. (Reuters)
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Rene Erni of Switzerland drops a marker during the FAI World Hot Air Balloon Championship near Gross-Siegharts, Austria on Monday, August 20. (Reuters)
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Competitors take part in the FAI World Hot Air Balloon Championship near Gross-Siegharts, Austria on Monday, August 20. (Reuters)
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Competitors take part in the FAI World Hot Air Balloon Championship near Gross-Siegharts, Austria on Monday, August 20. (Reuters)
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Judges watch competitors approach a target during the FAI World Hot Air Balloon Championship near Gross-Siegharts, Austria on Monday, August 20. (Reuters)
Updated 20 August 2018
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Hot air balloons take flight over Austria for world championship

  • Around 100 teams from more than 38 countries are taking part in the biennial event
  • Competitive ballooning test pilots’ skills in distance, speed and navigational precision

GROSS-SIEGHARTS, Austria: The northern Austrian sky was filled with colorful hot air balloons early on Monday morning as the sport’s world championship sailed into view.
Around 100 teams from more than 38 countries are taking part in the biennial event, which is being held in Gross-Siegharts near the Czech border.
Competitive ballooning test pilots’ skills in distance, speed and navigational precision, according to the World Air Sports Federation that oversees the sport.
Each flight is scheduled for 5am (0300 GMT) and 5pm when light winds usually allow for safer take off and landings. The event runs until Friday.


Cat filter appears during Pakistani official’s live-stream briefing

Updated 17 June 2019
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Cat filter appears during Pakistani official’s live-stream briefing

  • Social media was quick to pounce on the image
  • Politician's team says actions have been taken to prevent “such an incident” in the future

PESHAWAR: It was a mistake that had some people in Pakistan scratching their whiskers.
A regional minister was giving a briefing that was live-streamed on social media last week when viewers noticed officials appeared as cats. Someone had left a cat filter on.
Social media was quick to pounce on the image.
In a statement posted on Twitter, the ruling party’s social media team wrote after investigating it determined “human error” by a hard working volunteer caused the mistake. The team said the cat filter was removed “within a few minutes.”
The team says actions have been taken to prevent “such an incident” in the future.