Oman supermarket manager sacks employee for insulting Kerala flood victims

The death toll is close to 400 and rising, but there are also hundreds of thousands of people who have been evacuated, while others are yet to be reached by rescue crews. (AFP/Files)
Updated 21 August 2018
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Oman supermarket manager sacks employee for insulting Kerala flood victims

  • Hundreds of people have died in the floods that have devastated entire areas of Kerala
  • The man was responding to an offer to send help to flood victims when he posted the insults

DUBAI: A supermarket manager in Oman sacked a cashier after they posted insulting comments about the Kerala flood victims on social media, national daily, Times of Oman reported.

The cashier – who is also from Kerala - was replying to a post on Facebook in which someone had asked about sending supplies to the worst hit areas of the southern Indian state.

At least 400 people have been killed and hundreds of thousands have been displaced in the floods that have devastated vast areas of the Indian state.

The man’s comments – which the newspaper described as “insulting” – caused a backlash, with people slamming the man for his insensitivity.

Eventually his post was spotted by his employers and a letter was sent, announcing his termination from the company, the report added.

“This is to inform you that we have terminated you from services with immediate effect because of your highly insensitive and derogatory comments on social media with regard to the current flood situation in Kerala, India,” the letter stated.

The man has since tried to apologize, claiming in a video he posted on Facebook that he was intoxicated from unspecified substances.

He said in this video: “I apologize to everyone in Kerala. Because of my foolishness, a mistake happened on my behalf. I request everyone to forgive me. After that comment, my friends and others have been abusing me on Facebook.”


400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

Updated 25 September 2018
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400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

  • Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak

CASCAIS, Portugal: Archaeologists searching Portugal’s coast have found a 400-year-old shipwreck believed to have sunk near Lisbon after returning from India laden with spices, specialists said on Monday.
“From a heritage perspective, this is the discovery of the decade,” project director Jorge Freire said. “In Portugal, this is the most important find of all time.”
In and around the shipwreck, 40 feet (12 meters) below the surface, divers found spices, nine bronze cannons engraved with the Portuguese coat of arms, Chinese ceramics and cowry shells, a type of currency used to trade slaves during the colonial era.
Found on Sept. 3 off the coast of Cascais, a resort town on the outskirts of Lisbon, the shipwreck and its objects were “very well-preserved,” said Freire.
Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak.
In 1994, Portuguese ship Our Lady of the Martyrs was discovered near Fort of Sao Juliao da Barra, a military defense complex near Cascais.
“For a long time, specialists have considered the mouth of the Tagus river a hotspot for shipwrecks,” said Minister of Culture Luis Mendes. “This discovery came to prove it.”
The wreck was found as part of a 10-year-old archaeological project backed by the municipal council of Cascais, the navy, the Portuguese government and Nova University of Lisbon.