UAE-based designer creates modest fashion at a modest price

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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
Updated 21 August 2018
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UAE-based designer creates modest fashion at a modest price

DUBAI: For many modest fashion designers, it was the difficulty of finding stylish, high-street staples that played a role in why they initially set up shop. For Mosika Zeid, it was during her transition to hijab that she had her very own “a-ha” moment.
“[It] was honestly a fashion disaster,” the designer says of her time when she first started to wear a headscarf. “Being someone who was very fashion-conscious, and who loved to keep up with the latest trends and always look their best, I was shocked that I could not find everyday, on-trend modest fashion that had a reasonable price tag.”
Zeid, 33, is founder and CEO of the UAE-based modest fashion brand Desert Cove. It was as a lawyer that the Australian designer of Palestinian descent made her foray into the world of fashion.
“I was exposed to the fashion industry when I first started working as a lawyer over 12 years ago in Sydney and had some of the largest luxury fashion houses as my clients,” Zeid said. “When I came to the UAE, I consulted for some of the largest retailers. Through this I got an even greater insight into the business of fashion, as well as apparel production, sampling, fabrics and the whole process. And I just loved it.”
In July 2016, Desert Cove was born.
“This was a very soft launch,” Zeid said.
“The idea was just to test the market response to the concept.”
Receiving “an amazing response” encouraged Zeid to continue, and now she’s working on her third collection. Most recently, her team headed to Indonesia to show at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. “It was an amazing experience to connect with our South East Asian customers and to confirm that our sisters in that region are interested in Desert Cove,” she continued.
Another location that’s exciting to the designer at the moment is the Kingdom. “Saudi women have an impeccable sense of fashion and style. They are world class, so their requirements for fashion are also world class,” says Zeid.
“The fashion scene in Saudi Arabia is undergoing huge changes [and] this means that women are looking for day-to-day fashion inspiration, which meets their amazing fashion sense, while still not compromising on their modesty requirements.”
For Zeid, Desert Cove’s unique selling points are two-fold. “Firstly, we are one of the few brands dedicated to providing hijabis modest versions of the hottest mainstream fashion trends. Plus, we have a $50 price promise on our main collection items, and $100 on our exclusive retailer collections.”
Looking ahead, Zeid is now focusing on Desert Cove’s upcoming spring-summer 2019 collection, as well as distribution deals and Dubai Modest Fashion Week at the end of 2018. “We have just launched in House of Fraser in Yas Mall in Abu Dhabi and will be having a launch event in store in early October, which we are very excited about,” she revealed.
Needless to say, Zeid doesn’t have any regrets about setting up. “I am so happy that I did launch Desert Cove, as I really do feel that I am contributing to solving a problem that women are facing, helping them to feel better about themselves and lead their most active and productive lives that they can.”


Lebanese designers take over Los Angeles awards show... again

Updated 20 November 2018
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Lebanese designers take over Los Angeles awards show... again

DUBAI: The red carpet at the annual Governors Awards in Hollywood was awash with Middle Eastern gowns as the likes of Rashida Jones, Michelle Yeoh and Lily Collins chose to wear creations by Lebanese designers — proving that the region’s fashion stars are as popular as ever with the who’s who of the film industry.
British-American actress Collins, who starred in 2017’s “To the Bone,” chose a gown by Georges Chakra, with a sparkling purple skirt and off-the-shoulder black bodice for Sunday night’s event in Los Angeles.

(AFP)


Meanwhile, “Parks and Recreation” actress Jones went for a sunset orange kaftan with a peek-a-boo cut out and silver detailing at the neckline by Reem Acra.

(AFP)


For her part, Yeoh, who starred in blockbuster hit “Crazy Rich Asians,” wore an ice blue, figure-hugging gown by Elie Saab, complete with cutouts on the heavily beaded bodice.

(AFP)


The event honoring the careers of film industry legends Tyson, Levy and composer Lalo Schifrin brought some of Hollywood’s biggest names — Oprah, Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg, Quincy Jones, Harrison Ford and Clint Eastwood among them — to the Ray Dolby Ballroom in the heart of Hollywood to reminisce, laugh and schmooze without the pressure, as Hanks said, of “being nervous about who is going to win.”
The Governors Awards celebrate the careers of a few entertainment veterans who have not yet won an Academy Award by bestowing them with an honorary Oscar statuette. Recipients are voted on by the board of governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
For the 93-year-old Tyson, it was a half lifetime coming. It had been 45 years since her first and only nomination, for “Sounder” in 1972.
“This is a culmination of all those years of haves and have nots,” Tyson said, noting that she’ll be turning 94 next month.
The private, untelevised dinner gala at the Hollywood & Highland complex has also become an important stop on the campaign trail to the Academy Awards for some of the year’s awards hopefuls, making the event one of the most star-studded of the season. In a spin around the room, The Associated Press saw Nicole Kidman chatting with “First Man” director Damien Chazelle, Disney CEO Bob Iger leaving his seat next to Ford to meet Lady Gaga, “Eighth Grade” director Bo Burnham and “Roma” director Alfonso Cuaron deep in conversation, Hanks and Rita Wilson stopping to greet Melissa McCarthy, John Krasinski and Emily Blunt saying hello to Hilary Swank, the cast of “Black Panther” posing for a photo with Marvel chief Kevin Feige and Lin-Manuel Miranda hanging out with the “Crazy Rich Asians” cast and, later, Jonah Hill.
But all turned their full attention to the stage and the titans being honored when the time came. For while the event may be in its 10th year, and the honorary Oscar itself in its 60th, there was still room for a few firsts. Levy became the first member of the public relations branch of the film academy to win an honorary Oscar, while Kennedy became the first woman to win the prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Memorial award — an honor that she shared with her husband and partner Marshall.