UAE-based designer creates modest fashion at a modest price

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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
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Mosika Zeid showed her Desert Cove designs at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. (Mosika Zeid)
Updated 21 August 2018
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UAE-based designer creates modest fashion at a modest price

DUBAI: For many modest fashion designers, it was the difficulty of finding stylish, high-street staples that played a role in why they initially set up shop. For Mosika Zeid, it was during her transition to hijab that she had her very own “a-ha” moment.
“[It] was honestly a fashion disaster,” the designer says of her time when she first started to wear a headscarf. “Being someone who was very fashion-conscious, and who loved to keep up with the latest trends and always look their best, I was shocked that I could not find everyday, on-trend modest fashion that had a reasonable price tag.”
Zeid, 33, is founder and CEO of the UAE-based modest fashion brand Desert Cove. It was as a lawyer that the Australian designer of Palestinian descent made her foray into the world of fashion.
“I was exposed to the fashion industry when I first started working as a lawyer over 12 years ago in Sydney and had some of the largest luxury fashion houses as my clients,” Zeid said. “When I came to the UAE, I consulted for some of the largest retailers. Through this I got an even greater insight into the business of fashion, as well as apparel production, sampling, fabrics and the whole process. And I just loved it.”
In July 2016, Desert Cove was born.
“This was a very soft launch,” Zeid said.
“The idea was just to test the market response to the concept.”
Receiving “an amazing response” encouraged Zeid to continue, and now she’s working on her third collection. Most recently, her team headed to Indonesia to show at Jakarta Modest Fashion Week. “It was an amazing experience to connect with our South East Asian customers and to confirm that our sisters in that region are interested in Desert Cove,” she continued.
Another location that’s exciting to the designer at the moment is the Kingdom. “Saudi women have an impeccable sense of fashion and style. They are world class, so their requirements for fashion are also world class,” says Zeid.
“The fashion scene in Saudi Arabia is undergoing huge changes [and] this means that women are looking for day-to-day fashion inspiration, which meets their amazing fashion sense, while still not compromising on their modesty requirements.”
For Zeid, Desert Cove’s unique selling points are two-fold. “Firstly, we are one of the few brands dedicated to providing hijabis modest versions of the hottest mainstream fashion trends. Plus, we have a $50 price promise on our main collection items, and $100 on our exclusive retailer collections.”
Looking ahead, Zeid is now focusing on Desert Cove’s upcoming spring-summer 2019 collection, as well as distribution deals and Dubai Modest Fashion Week at the end of 2018. “We have just launched in House of Fraser in Yas Mall in Abu Dhabi and will be having a launch event in store in early October, which we are very excited about,” she revealed.
Needless to say, Zeid doesn’t have any regrets about setting up. “I am so happy that I did launch Desert Cove, as I really do feel that I am contributing to solving a problem that women are facing, helping them to feel better about themselves and lead their most active and productive lives that they can.”


Lana El-Sahely gets biker chic in Paris

Dior Fashion Show SS'19. (AFP)
Updated 3 min 43 sec ago
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Lana El-Sahely gets biker chic in Paris

  • Lana El-Sahely showed off her style at Paris Fashion Week
  • Dior led Paris fashion week with a new modern dance piece by choreographer Sharon Eyal

DUBAI: Lebanese fashion blogger Lana El-Sahely showed off her style at Paris Fashion Week, posing for cameras at the coveted Dior show earlier this week.

Dior led Paris fashion week on a sensual dance Monday with a spectacular show woven around a new modern dance piece by choreographer Sharon Eyal to kick off the nine-day extravaganza.

For her part, El-Sahely wore a quirky patchwork skirt paired with a leather biker jacket over a delicate lace top. She finished off the look with a peaked cap and chunky boots.

On the catwalk, icily restrained models brushed past writhing dancers in a performance specially created by the acclaimed Israeli in a fog of mist and falling paper petals.

Designer Maria Grazia Chiuri told AFP that using dance was “an act of liberation” to break free from the catwalk corset.

Gucci — which quit Milan for the French capital to show its spring summer collection — later got in on the act by taking over a Paris theater and having singer Jane Birkin, her back turned to most of the audience, sing her 1983 hit “Baby Alone in Babylone.”

With K-pop superstar Kai mobbed outside by fans, Gucci’s designer Alessandro Michele served up an extra large helping of the oddball 1970s kitsch which has made him such a hit with millennials.

Mickey Mouse manbags, wacky Y-fronts, sleeping mask shades, underpants on the outside of slacks and medallions as big as mayoral chains are only a taster of some of the wacky new looks fashion’s jester-in-chief pulled from his wide-brimmed hat.

His playful, luxuriant bad taste could not be further from Chiuri’s earnest elegance.

Chiuri said she wanted to replicate dance’s “naturalness... but also its discipline” in a striking

Meanwhile, Saint Laurent headlined the second day of Paris Fashion Week in an eclectic French twist on American styles that featured models walking on water.

Tuesday’s Spring/Summer collections also showcased emerging talents: from 26-year-old designer Marine Serre to the Tokyo-based house Anrealage, The Associated Press reported.

Stars such as Kate Moss, Cindy Crawford, Matt Dillon and Salma Hayek huddled together in front of 10 giant white palm trees as the Eiffel Tower sparkled at the stroke of 8 p.m.

Below the trees was a giant expanse of water.

Models in luxury snake boots and sparkling disco heels suddenly appeared and — forgoing the dry catwalk strip — darted sideward to walk straight across the water.

It triggered gasps from spectators, including a tardy Lindsay Lohan.

But behold, the models didn’t sink. Instead, they merely sloshed and splashed.

Designer Anthony Vaccarello was applauded for an impressive biblical-style trompe l’oeil feature for the 15-minute show that created the illusion of a sea despite the water measuring only two centimeters in depth.

One American fashion editor duly commented that designers are “ruining a lot of perfectly good shoes with these water effects this season.”