Tycoon killed in plane crash leaves $52m fortune to Oxfam

Richard Cousins was killed along with his family members on New Year's Eve in a plane crash in Australia. (Reuters)
Updated 21 August 2018
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Tycoon killed in plane crash leaves $52m fortune to Oxfam

LONDON: A tycoon killed with his family in a seaplane crash in Australia on New Year's Eve left a $52 million fortune to the crisis-hit charity Oxfam.
The bequest comes at a time when Oxfam is trying to find $21 million in savings as it grapples with the fallout from a sex abuse scandal.
The charity, which has lost thousands of donors since reports earlier this year that its staff used prostitutes while working in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, said it had only recently been notified and could not confirm the amount.
"We are extremely grateful for this bequest," Oxfam said in a statement.
Richard Cousins, 58, boss of catering giant Compass Group, died with sons William, 25, Edward, 23, fiancee Emma Bowden, 48, and her daughter Heather, 11, when their plane nose-dived into the Hawkesbury River north of Sydney.
The Sun newspaper reported that some time before the crash Cousins drew up a will with a "common tragedy clause", leaving his money to Oxfam in the event that he and his sons were killed together.
Oxfam said it was working with Cousins' family and its board of trustees to identify how the bequest would be used.
The sum is more than twice the amount received from legacies in the year 2016 to 2017.
The Sun said all but £3 million pounds of Cousins' fortune would go to the charity. Two brothers will receive £1 million each.
The seaplane was part of the Sydney Seaplanes business that has operated since 2005 with no previous record of mishap.
A preliminary investigation found it was off course, but could not determine the cause of the crash, which also killed Australian pilot Gareth Morgan.


Iran adhering to nuclear deal: British PM

Updated 5 min 36 sec ago
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Iran adhering to nuclear deal: British PM

  • “From what we see, we believe that it is doing that,” Theresa May told CBS
  • But there are other issues outside the deal that also need to be dealt with, she said

WASHINGTON: Iran is adhering to its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal and the accord — repudiated by the United States — should stay in place, Britain’s prime minister said in an interview broadcast on Sunday.
“From what we see, we believe that it is doing that,” Theresa May told CBS.
“We believe that that should stay in place. And others, involved in putting that deal together believe that it should stay in place,” May said in excerpts of an interview shown on “Face the Nation” that was to air in full Monday on “This Morning.”
But there are other issues outside the deal that also need to be dealt with, she said.
“Looking at the issue of ballistic missiles. Looking at — the way in which — Iran is acting in the region — to destabilize the region. We need to address those issues,” May said.
May’s interview came as world leaders geared up for a week of high-stakes diplomacy at the UN General Assembly, which is set to be dominated by North Korea and Iran.
On Wednesday, President Donald Trump will for the first time chair a Security Council meeting on non-proliferation and weapons of mass destruction that will focus heavily on Iran — likely triggering a clash with other big powers.
Earlier this year, Trump pulled the US out of the deal it reached with Iran and five other countries in 2015. That accord lifted sanctions against Tehran in exchange for restrictions on its nuclear program.
Now, the US is reimposing those sanctions.
Other parties to the deal have argued that it is working and should stay in place, while the International Atomic Energy Agency has said Iran is complying with the accord.