Cattle slaughtered at alternative Jakarta mosques to protect horses at Asian Games

Riders train ahead of the dressage individual intermediate 1 final in the equestrian event at the 2018 Asian Games in Jakarta on August 22, 2018. (AFP / Arief Bagus)
Updated 29 August 2018
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Cattle slaughtered at alternative Jakarta mosques to protect horses at Asian Games

  • Jakarta has banned the trade and slaughter of livestock in 35 mosques in the area, in anticipation of Eid and the seasonal trade coinciding with the games
  • The rules of the games state that the area within a kilometer radius of the venue should be an equine disease-free zone

JAKARTA: Eid was quiet for Ferry Mardani, a seasonal goat and cattle trader who normally sets up a temporary barn in the front yard of Pulo Asem Grand Mosque in East Jakarta, a week before Eid.
Most years he sells 90 goats and six cows to local Muslims who want to donate their sacrificial animals to the mosque and have them slaughtered there. By the end of the season, he can reap at least 25 million rupiah ($1.7 million) from the trade.
“This year, the mosque didn’t accept sacrificial animals or slaughter them. We are complying with the governor’s instruction to have this area free from any cattle because our location is within a kilometer radius of the equestrian park,” Mardani told Arab News.
The Jakarta International Equestrian Park in the Pulomas district is hosting three equestrian competitions for the 18th Asian Games. The rules of the games state that the area within a kilometer radius of the venue should be an equine disease-free zone.
Last October the then-governor of Jakarta, Djarot Saiful Hidayat, issued an order banning the trade and slaughter of livestock in 35 mosques in the area, in anticipation of Eid and the seasonal trade coinciding with the games, which run from Aug. 18 to Sept. 2.
Ani Suyani, who lives in Pulomas, donated her sacrificial cow to Al Mujahidin Mosque, which is in the Kayu Putih neighborhood near the park.
“The mosque still received donations, they arranged to buy the cattle and have them slaughtered directly in Pulo Gebang abattoir. The mosque’s qurban committee will pack the meat in small bags and take them back here for distribution in the afternoon,” she told Arab News.
Purnomo, a caretaker of Al Hurriyah Mosque in Pulo Asem neighborhood, said the mosque still received donations of animals but they slaughtered the animals – seven goats and a cow — in Al Watsiyah Mosque, outside the restricted zone.
“Usually we receive up to 30 goats every year and we slaughter them here. But this year some congregation members decided to donate their sacrificial animals elsewhere because of the restriction,” Purnomo told Arab News.
“We understand this restriction is to support the Asian Games. It’s no problem that we can’t sell and slaughter the animals here at the mosque this year,” he said.
“The Asian Games is probably a once in a lifetime event for most of us here. I wasn’t even born the last time we had it in Jakarta,” Purnomo said.
The last time Jakarta hosted the games was in 1962.
This year Jakarta is co-host of the games, alongside Palembang, the provincial capital of South Sumatra. This is the first time that the games have been co-hosted.


UK firms step up preparations for a ‘no-deal’ Brexit as PM Theresa May meets with EU leaders

Updated 21 March 2019
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UK firms step up preparations for a ‘no-deal’ Brexit as PM Theresa May meets with EU leaders

  • May is meeting EU leaders in Brussels on Thursday in attempt to get support for Brexit delay
  • The Bank of England warned in November that the British economy could shrink by a massive 8 percent

LONDON: UK companies have ratcheted up their preparations for a disorderly “no-deal” Brexit as best they can over the past couple of months, the Bank of England said on Thursday.
With the prospect of a chaotic Brexit potentially eight days away, a survey by the central bank’s agents showed that around 80 percent of companies “judged themselves ready” for such a scenario, in which the country crashes out of the European Union with no deal and no transition to new trading arrangements with the bloc. That’s up from around 50 percent in an equivalent survey in January.
For decades, trading with the rest of the EU has been seamless. A disorderly Brexit could see the return of tariffs and other restrictions on trade with the EU, Britain’s main export destination.
To prepare, some firms have moved jobs and operations to the EU to continue to benefit from its seamless trade. Many have had to learn how to file customs declarations and adjust labels on goods. Exporters of animals are learning about health checks they will need to comply with.
According to the bank’s survey, however, many of those companies preparing for a “no-deal” Brexit said “there were limits to the degree of readiness that was feasible in the face of the range of possible outcomes in that scenario.”
There’s only so much companies can do, for example, to prepare for new tariffs and exchange rate movements.

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Britain appears headed for a “no-deal” Brexit on March 29 if Prime Minister Theresa May fails to win parliamentary support for her withdrawal agreement with the EU.
She is meeting EU leaders in Brussels on Thursday in an attempt to get support for a delay to the country’s departure date to June 30. EU leaders have said a short extension would have to be conditional on her Brexit plan getting parliamentary backing and have indicated they would only be willing to back a delay to May 22, the day before elections to the European Parliament. After two heavy rejections in parliament, there are doubts as to whether she will be able to get parliamentary approval. What would happen next is uncertain.
European leaders, including those from France and Luxembourg, have said any extension will be granted dependent on May's deal passing a third parliamentary vote.
The Bank of England warned in November that the British economy could shrink by a massive 8 percent within months, though Governor Mark Carney has indicated the recession will be less savage, partly because of heightened preparedness.
According to the minutes of the latest meeting of the bank’s nine-member Monetary Policy Committee, at which the main interest rate was kept at 0.75 percent, rate-setters warned “Brexit uncertainties would continue to affect economic activity looking ahead, most notably business investment.”
Brexit uncertainty has dogged the British economy for nearly three years. In 2018, the economy grew by 1.4 percent, its lowest rate since 2012, even during what was then a global upswing. Business investment was down 3.7 percent in the fourth quarter from the year before.
“Business investment had now fallen in each of the past four quarters as uncertainties relating to Brexit had intensified,” the rate-setters said.
The survey showed uncertainty was likely to remain for months, even years, as Britain works out its long-term relationship with the EU. It said around 60 percent of UK firms in February said Brexit was one of their top three uncertainties, compared with 40 percent just after the June 2016 Brexit referendum.
Around 40 percent of firms expect the uncertainty to be resolved only by the end of 2019 and 20 percent anticipate it persisting into 2021 or beyond.