Saudi Arabian culture, heritage showcase continues in Jakarta

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The Saudi House continued showcasing its activities for the sixth day in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. (SPA)
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The Saudi House continued showcasing its activities for the sixth day in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. (SPA)
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The Saudi House continued showcasing its activities for the sixth day in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. (SPA)
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The Saudi House continued showcasing its activities for the sixth day in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. (SPA)
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The Saudi House continued showcasing its activities for the sixth day in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. (SPA)
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The Saudi House continued showcasing its activities for the sixth day in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. (SPA)
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The Saudi House continued showcasing its activities for the sixth day in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta. (SPA)
Updated 24 August 2018
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Saudi Arabian culture, heritage showcase continues in Jakarta

  • The Saudi House continued its showcase of Saudi Arabian culture in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta
  • The event aims to show authentic cultural heritage and has been impressing visitors

LONDON: The Saudi House continued its showcase of Saudi Arabian culture in the Indonesian capital, Jakarta on Friday. 

Organized by the Saudi Arabian Olympic Committee, in cooperation with the General Authority for Culture, the event aims to show authentic cultural heritage — the Arabic calligraphy section attracted many visitors — and has been impressing visitors, who expressed admiration for the Kingdom’s great cultural and civilizational heritage.
Calligrapher Abdelaziz Al-Naghmush, a participant in the pavilion of visual arts, explained that the section includes several paintings that represent the characteristics and beauty of calligraphy.
He said it aims to introduce Arabic calligraphy and its various types to visitors, such as Diwani, Thuluth, Riq’ah and Naskh.
The exhibition also includes a photography corner containing a number of images that dazzled Indonesian audiences and showcased the Kingdom’s beauty caught by the lens of the creative Saudis. The exhibiotion was held under the supervision of Abdulrahman Al-Barih along with Musician and artist Ahad Hussein.
The handicraft pavilion witnessed a great demand from all ages, where visitors lined up for engravings in Henna on their hands.
Participating craftsperson Jumana Hajjlas said: “All visitors are asking for the inscription of their hands with Henna, and the inscription is usually written in Arabic,” referring to the large number of visitors from the Indonesian public.
The folk arts teams performed and danced and entertained the Indonesian public.
The General Authority for Culture, through the participation of the Saudi Arabian Olympic Committee in Indonesia, aims to introduce Saudi culture to Indonesian society and enhance cultural communication between the two countries, in addition to conveying the true picture of the Saudi cultural scene and its progress in all fields under the Kingdom’s Vision 2030.


Saudi Crown prince’s India visit will help expand ties beyond energy

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s visit to India will boost robust interactions that New Delhi has established with Saudi Arabia over the last few years. (Supplied)
Updated 20 February 2019
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Saudi Crown prince’s India visit will help expand ties beyond energy

  • New Delhi’s participation in Kingdom’s mega projects a major aspect of renewed ties: Talmiz Ahmad

NEW DELHI: Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s first visit to India is a landmark development in bilateral ties between India and Saudi Arabia, according to Talmiz Ahmad, a former ambassador to Riyadh.

Saudi Arabia is India’s largest supplier of crude oil, but since taking office in 2014 Prime Minister Narendra Modi has sought to use India’s growing economy to attract more investment from Saudi Arabia beyond energy, and foster cooperation on trade, infrastructure and defense.

Ahmad, author of several books on the Arab world and twice India’s Ambassador to Riyadh, said that while the backbone of New Delhi’s relationship with the Kingdom is energy, the two sides had been discussing “how to give greater substance and longevity to the relationship on the basis of concrete projects.”

Reuters reported this week that India is expecting Prince Salman to announce an initial investment in its National Investment and Infrastructure Fund, a quasi-sovereign wealth fund, to help accelerate the building of ports and highways. Saudi Arabia has also suggested investing in India’s farming industry, with an eye on food imports to the Kingdom. 

Ahmad said Saudi Arabia’s NEOM project, a $500 billion smart city in Tabuk province on the Egyptian and Jordanian borders, would also provide great opportunities for Indian companies. 

He added that Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030, the crown prince’s blueprint to fundamentally transform Kingdom’s economy, presents another opportunity for Indian businesses to prosper from the relationship.

“India is extremely well placed,” said Ahmad. “We are world leaders in small and medium enterprises and in the services sector. Saudi Arabia also has proposals to develop its tourism and leisure sectors, and I believe India is also well placed in those areas too.”

He also discussed how the strategic partnership had been initiated by former Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, who visited Riyadh in 2010, but that Modi, who visited in 2016, had added “considerable substance” to the relationship.

He stressed, though, that Riyadh’s ties with India are independent of its relationship with Pakistan. He added India and Saudi Arabia were also working together to improve the security situation in Afghanistan, to resolve the 17-year conflict between government forces and the Afghan Taliban, as well as in the wider West Asia region. 

“India has excellent relations with all the countries in West Asia, and New Delhi is well placed to address some of the concerns that all the countries have with each other,” he said.