What We Are Reading Today: Canids of the World

Updated 26 August 2018
0

What We Are Reading Today: Canids of the World

This stunningly illustrated and easy-to-use field guide covers every species of the world’s carnivorous animals, from the gray wolf of North America to the dholes of Asia, from African jackals to the South American bush dog.
It features more than 150 superb color plates, depicting every kind of carnivorous animals and detailed facing-page species accounts which describe key identification features, morphology, distribution, sub-speciation, habitat, and conservation status in the wild, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website.
The book also includes distribution maps and tips on where to observe each species, making Canids of the World the most comprehensive and user-friendly guide to these intriguing and spectacular mammals.
The book covers every species and subspecies of carnivorous animals by featuring more than 150 color plates with over 600 photos from around the globe.
It depicts species in similar poses for quick and easy comparisons, describing key identification features, habitat, behavior, reproduction, and much more.
The guide draws on the latest taxonomic research on the subject and includes distribution maps and tips on where to observe each species.


What We Are Reading Today: How to Fall Slower Than Gravity

Updated 15 min 19 sec ago
0

What We Are Reading Today: How to Fall Slower Than Gravity

Author: Paul J. Nahin

Paul Nahin is a master at explaining odd phenomena through straightforward mathematics. In this collection of 26 intriguing problems, he explores how mathematical physicists think. Always entertaining, the problems range from ancient catapult conundrums to the puzzling physics of a very peculiar kind of glass called NASTYGLASS— and from dodging trucks to why raindrops fall slower than the rate of gravity. The questions raised may seem impossible to answer at first and may require an unexpected twist in reasoning, but sometimes their solutions are surprisingly simple. Nahin’s goal, however, is always to guide readers— who will need only to have studied advanced high school math and physics— in expanding their mathematical thinking to make sense of the curiosities of the physical world.
The problems are in the first part of the book and the solutions are in the second, so that readers may challenge themselves to solve the questions on their own before looking at the explanations. The problems show how mathematics — including algebra, trigonometry, geometry, and calculus — can be united with physical laws to solve both real and theoretical problems.

Historical anecdotes woven throughout the book bring alive the circumstances and people involved in some amazing discoveries and achievements.
More than a puzzle book, this work will immerse you in the delights of scientific history while honing your math skills.
Paul J. Nahin is the author of many popular math books, including In Praise of Simple Physics, Dr. Euler’s Fabulous Formula, and An Imaginary Tale (all Princeton).