What We Are Reading Today: Canids of the World

Updated 26 August 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Canids of the World

This stunningly illustrated and easy-to-use field guide covers every species of the world’s carnivorous animals, from the gray wolf of North America to the dholes of Asia, from African jackals to the South American bush dog.
It features more than 150 superb color plates, depicting every kind of carnivorous animals and detailed facing-page species accounts which describe key identification features, morphology, distribution, sub-speciation, habitat, and conservation status in the wild, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website.
The book also includes distribution maps and tips on where to observe each species, making Canids of the World the most comprehensive and user-friendly guide to these intriguing and spectacular mammals.
The book covers every species and subspecies of carnivorous animals by featuring more than 150 color plates with over 600 photos from around the globe.
It depicts species in similar poses for quick and easy comparisons, describing key identification features, habitat, behavior, reproduction, and much more.
The guide draws on the latest taxonomic research on the subject and includes distribution maps and tips on where to observe each species.


What We Are Reading Today: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff

Updated 20 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism by Shoshana Zuboff

  • New book reveals business model that underpins the digital world

Shoshana Zuboff’s new book is a chilling exposé of the business model that underpins the digital world. 

A review published in goodreads.com said that The Age of Surveillance Capitalism is neither a hand-wringing narrative of danger and decline nor a digital fairy tale. Rather, it offers a deeply reasoned and evocative examination of the contests over the next chapter of capitalism that will decide the meaning of information civilization in the 21st century. 

The Age of Surveillance Capital is a striking and illuminating book. 

A fellow reader remarked to me that it reminded him of Thomas Piketty’s magnum opus, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, in that it opens one’s eyes to things we ought to have noticed, but had not. 

And if we fail to tame the new capitalist mutant rampaging through our societies then we will only have ourselves to blame, for we can no longer plead ignorance,” stated John Naughton in a review published in The Guardian.