Australia’s new prime minister announces his Cabinet

Incoming Australian Prime Minister, Scott Morrison is sworn in at Government House, Canberra, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2018. (AP)
Updated 26 August 2018
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Australia’s new prime minister announces his Cabinet

  • Morrison won a ballot of government lawmakers for the leadership on Friday against rival Peter Dutton
  • The fractured conservative coalition government needs to present a united front to voters ahead of elections due by May

CANBERRA: Australia’s new prime minister announced a peace-making Cabinet on Sunday that does not punish his rivals in a bruising power struggle that ousted his predecessor days ago and divided a government that lags in opinion polls.
The fractured conservative coalition government needs to present a united front to voters ahead of elections due by May.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison won a ballot of government lawmakers for the leadership on Friday against rival Peter Dutton.
Morrison had been loyal to his predecessor, Malcolm Turnbull, whom Dutton had demanded prove he had the support of ruling Liberal Party lawmakers in a ballot. Turnbull resigned.
Morrison, who last week was the treasurer, returned Dutton to the home affairs ministry he had held under Turnbull.
Mathias Cormann, a party power broker who backed Dutton, retained his finance portfolio.
Australia’s first female foreign minister, Julie Bishop, announced earlier Sunday that she had quit the Cabinet.
The 62-year-old Bishop had had been deputy leader of the ruling party since 2007 and failed to become prime minister in Friday’s leadership ballot.
Opposition lawmaker Penny Wong paid tribute to Bishop for her trailblazing role in foreign affairs.
Bishop will be replaced as foreign minister by Marise Payne, Australia’s first female defense minister.


One third of UN workers say sexually harassed in past two years

Updated 49 sec ago
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One third of UN workers say sexually harassed in past two years

UNITED NATIONS: One third of UN staff and contractors experienced sexual harassment in the past two years, according to a report released by the United Nations on Tuesday.
The online survey, carried out by Deloitte in November, was completed by 30,364 people from the United Nations and its agencies — just 17 percent of those eligible. In a letter to staff, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres described the response rate as “moderately low.”
“This tells me two things: first — that we still have a long way to go before we are able to fully and openly discuss sexual harassment; and second — that there may also be an ongoing sense of mistrust, perceptions of inaction and lack of accountability,” he wrote.
The survey comes amid the wider “Me Too” movement around the world against sexual harassment and assault.
According to the report, 21.7 percent of respondents said they were subjected to sexual stories or offensive jokes, 14.2 percent received offensive remarks about their appearance, body or sexual activities and 13 percent were targeted by unwelcome attempts to draw them into a discussion on sexual matters.
Some 10.9 percent said they were subjected to gestures or use of body language of a sexual nature, which embarrassed or offended them, and 10.1 percent were touched in way that made them feel uncomfortable.
More than half of those experienced sexual harassment said it happened in an office environment, while 17.1 percent said it happened at a work-related social event. Two out of three harassers were male, according to the survey.
Only one in three people said they took action after experiencing sexual harassment.
Guterres said the report contained “some sobering statistics and evidence of what needs to change to make a harassment-free workplace real for all of us.”
“As an organization founded on equality, dignity and human rights, we must lead by example and set the standard,” he said.
The United Nations has tried to increase transparency and strengthen how it deals with such accusations over the past few years after a string of sexual exploitation and abuse accusations against UN peacekeepers in Africa.
The head of the UN agency for HIV and AIDS is also stepping down in June, six months before his term ends, after an independent panel said that his “defective leadership” tolerated “a culture of harassment, including sexual harassment, bullying, and abuse of power.”