What We Are Reading Today: World War I and American Art

Updated 27 August 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: World War I and American Art

World War I had a profound impact on American art and culture. Nearly every major artist responded to events, whether as official war artists, impassioned observers, or participants on the battlefields.

It was the moment when American artists, designers, and illustrators began to consider the importance of their contributions to the wider world and to visually represent the United States’ emergent role in modern global politics.

World War I and American Art, edited by Robert Cozzolino, Anne Classen Knutson and David M. Lubin, provides an unprecedented consideration of the impact of the conflict on American artists and the myriad ways they reacted to it.

Artists took a leading role in chronicling the war, crafting images that influenced public opinion, supported mobilization efforts, and helped to shape how the appalling human toll was mourned and memorialized.

World War I and American Art features some 80 artists— including Ivan Albright, George Bellows, Marsden Hartley, Childe Hassam, Violet Oakley, Georgia O’Keeffe, Man Ray, John Singer Sargent, and Claggett Wilson— whose paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, posters, and ephemera span the diverse visual culture of the period to tell the story of a crucial turning point in the history of American art.

Taking readers from the home front to the battlefront, this landmark book will remain the definitive reference on a pivotal moment in American modern art for years to come.


What We Are Reading Today: Churchill: Walking with destiny by Andrew Roberts

Updated 20 November 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Churchill: Walking with destiny by Andrew Roberts

  • The story Roberts tells is sophisticated and in the end more satisfying
  • The book being deals with all the controversies in his career that you would expect

Winston Churchill was born on Nov. 30, 1874, at Blenheim Palace, the ancestral home of the Duke of Marlborough. 

Historian Andrew Roberts’ insight about Winston Churchill’s relation to fate in “Churchill: Walking With Destiny” comes directly from the subject himself. 

“I felt as if I were walking with destiny,” Churchill wrote of that moment in May 1940 when he achieved the highest office. 

But the story Roberts tells is more sophisticated and in the end more satisfying. 

The book covers Churchill’s post-war warnings about the Soviet threat and his second premiership in the early-to-mid 1950s, including his complex relationship with Anthony Eden, his successor-in-waiting. 

Roberts, who was born in 1963, took a first class honors degree in Modern History at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, from where he is an honorary senior scholar and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). He has written or edited 12 books, and appears regularly on radio and television around the world.

“The book being deals with all the controversies in his career that you would expect. However nothing can detract from the ultimate conclusion that Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was a very great man without whom humane civilization would not have been saved during those stern days of the Second World War,” stated a review published in goodreads.com