Ancient aqueducts unearthed as Fayd fort reveals its secrets

The sites included an ancient mosque dating back to the early Islamic era.
Updated 28 August 2018
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Ancient aqueducts unearthed as Fayd fort reveals its secrets

RIYADH: Saudi archaeologists have discovered underground aqueducts dating back to early Islamic period.
They were found during an excavation in the historic city of Fayd, in Hail, along with bakery ovens, wash basins and a large number of architectural sites.
“The archaeologists, who work under the supervision of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), found traces of the underground aqueducts in the archaeological city in Hail,” Majed Alshadeed, a SCTH spokesman, told Arab News on Monday.
The breakthrough discoveries were made outside the fort in Hail, with a second site uncovered in the area between the two walls of the southern side of the fort. A third site was found at Al-Qalqah citadel.
The sites included an ancient mosque dating back to the early Islamic era, in addition to architectural units with several rooms, and architectural details buried between the exterior and interior walls of the fort.
The archaeological action plan included detecting, preparing and cleaning old wells in the traditional city. The wells are connected to the underground aqueducts, Alshadeed said.
A service site for the ancient fort was also uncovered, with bakery ovens and wash basins found in channels that pass through the last underground square.
Pottery utensils, and glass, stone and metal pieces were also retrieved.
The city of Fayd is a major archaeological and historical site, located 120 kilometers east of the city of Hail.
It is the third city of the old pilgrimage route “Darb Zubaidah” — after Kufa and Basra — and the largest station on the pilgrimage route used by millions of pilgrims for their once-in-a-lifetime Hajj journey to the holy city of Makkah.
Foundations located in the northern part of the fort were built in regular forms using volcanic stones commonly found in the city. Some architectural forms and objects such as basins were also carved from volcanic rock.
The presence of iron residues showed the objects may have been in the manufacture of glass and iron.


UAE body lauds Saudi Arabia’s efforts at enhancing security

Updated 17 January 2019
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UAE body lauds Saudi Arabia’s efforts at enhancing security

  • “The Kingdom acts as a safety net for the Arab and Islamic worlds,” says Federal National Council chair

JEDDAH: A prominent member of the UAE Federal National Council (FNC) has praised the Kingdom’s efforts at enhancing security and development.

Amal Al-Qubaisi, FNC chairperson and speaker, met with members of the Saudi Shoura Council during a delegation visit to the UAE headed by Ahmed Al-Ghamdi, deputy chairman of the Saudi-Emirati Parliamentary Friendship Committee.

Al-Qubaisi reiterated that unity on various regional and international issues enhances security and stability.

“The Kingdom acts as a safety net for the Arab and Islamic worlds,” she said during a meeting at the FNC headquarters in Abu Dhabi. “King Salman is a father figure to both the Saudi and Emirati people.”

Al-Qubaisi said Saudi-Emirati strategic relations are reflected in coordination efforts between the Shoura Council and the FNC and commended the work of Shoura Council Chairman Abdullah Al-Asheikh.

Al-Ghamdi said strong fraternal relations between the two countries would strengthen regional unity and counter foreign actors attempting to sow the seeds of discord.

He also reiterated that the two nations share a common history, lineage and culture.

During the meeting, the two sides discussed ways that the council and FNC could enhance parliamentary relations.

The delegation also met with the Gulf Cooperation Council Parliamentary Friendship Group, which was headed by Mohammed Al-Ameri, chairman of the FNC Defense, Interior and Foreign Affairs Committee. FNC Secretary-General Ahmed Al-Dhaheri was also present at the meeting.

Delegation members also partially attended a regular FNC session, in which they got a glimpse into the council’s day-to-day operations.