Libyan interior minister of GNA announces ceasefire deal in Tripoli

Libyan security forces patrol on August 23, 2018 near the site of an attack on a checkpoint in the city of Zliten, 170 km east of the capital Tripoli. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 28 August 2018
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Libyan interior minister of GNA announces ceasefire deal in Tripoli

  • The agreement provides for the handover of the headquarters of the Seventh Brigade to the Tripoli Security Directorate
  • The agreement came in the wake of bloody clashes that left several dead and wounded

Libya’s Interior Minister of the Government of National Accord (GNA), Brigadier-General Abdel Salam Ashour, announced a ceasefire agreement with warring sides in the south-eastern suburb of Tripoli.

“The agreement provides for the handover of the headquarters of the Seventh Brigade to the Tripoli Security Directorate,” Ashour said in a brief statement quoted by a local channel on Monday night.

In his statement, the Interior Minister did not disclose any further details on the terms of the agreement.

The agreement came in the wake of bloody clashes that left several dead and wounded, promting international calls for calm in the Libyan capital.

The Health Ministry reported on Facebook that five have been registered as killed and 33 injured so far due to the clashes.

The United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) said on its website that it was following the clashes in and around Tripoli with “grave concern,” calling on all parties to immediately cease all military action.

The European Union also called for ceasefire and end of hostilities in Tripoli, while the Italian and British embassies in Libya condemned the violence.


Syrian opposition sees window for political solution in Syria

Updated 19 January 2019
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Syrian opposition sees window for political solution in Syria

RIYADH: Syria now has a good opportunity to reach a political solution to its devastating eight-year war as cease-fires have brought calm to many areas of the country, Syria’s chief opposition negotiator said on Saturday.
“I think now that we have an opportunity, because nearly in Syria we have a cease-fire now, in the northeast of Syria and the north of Syria, and the efforts of fighting terrorism has achieved good results,” Nasr Hariri told Reuters in an interview in the Saudi Arabian capital Riyadh, where he is based.
Hariri, the opposition’s chief negotiator in UN peace talks, met with the newly appointed United Nations Special Envoy to Syria Geir Pedersen on Friday.
“Now it is time to invest all of these developments: the cease-fire, fighting terrorism, the belief of the majority of the Syrian people that the only solution to the Syrian crisis is the political solution,” Hariri added.
In December, Russia, Iran and Turkey — supporters of the main sides in Syria’s complex civil war — failed to agree on the makeup of a UN-sponsored Syrian Constitutional Committee but called for it to convene early next year to kick off a viable peace process.
Syrian President Bashar Assad, whose forces have reclaimed most of Syria with Russian and Iranian support apart from the northern province of Idlib, has clung to power throughout the conflict and is widely seen as being loath to yield power after it ends.
Arab states, including some that once backed rebels against Assad, are seeking to reconcile with him after decisive gains by his forces in the war, aiming to expand their influence in Syria at the expense of non-Arab Turkey and Iran.
“All the countries... Turkey, to some extent Russia and the Arab countries believe ... that without a political solution, the normalization with the (Assad) regime would be impossible,” Hariri said.