Iran tells UN court ‘time running out’ under US sanctions

Tehran is basing its claim on the obscure 1955 Treaty of Amity and Economic Relations. (File/AFP)
Updated 29 August 2018
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Iran tells UN court ‘time running out’ under US sanctions

  • US President Donald Trump reimposed the sanctions after pulling out of a multilateral 2015 accord in May
  • US lawyers have retorted that the sanctions are necessary to protect international security

THE HAGUE: Iran told the UN’s top court Wednesday that “time is running out” for its people as they suffer economic turmoil that Tehran blames on renewed US sanctions.
Iran was making its closing arguments in a challenge to the sanctions at the International Court of Justice in The Hague.
US President Donald Trump reimposed the sanctions after pulling out of a multilateral 2015 accord in May.
Iran has asked the court to order the United States to lift them.
US lawyers have retorted that the sanctions are necessary to protect international security.
They said economic mismanagement is at the root of Iran’s woes and that the ICJ — set up in 1946 to rule in disputes between countries — does not have jurisdiction to rule on Iran’s demand.
Washington reintroduced some sanctions this month, targeting financial transactions and imports of raw materials, cars and aircraft.
The measures have driven international companies to abandon projects in Iran.
A second wave of US measures is due to hit Iran in early November, targeting its vital energy sector including oil exports.
“For the Islamic Republic of Iran, time is running out,” Iran’s representative Mohsen Mohebi told the ICJ’s judges on Wednesday.
“The lives of millions of people residing in this country are already deeply suffering from the sanctions reinstated by the United States... and will further suffer as these sanctions are expanded and aggravated.”
Tehran is basing its claim on the obscure 1955 Treaty of Amity and Economic Relations, signed with the United States long before Iran’s Islamic revolution.
Despite the treaty, the two countries have not had diplomatic ties since 1980.


Libya seeks UN help as militia fighting kills 10

Updated 23 September 2018
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Libya seeks UN help as militia fighting kills 10

  • Libya’s internationally recognized government has called on the UN to take “concrete and effective” action to protect civilians and halt the fighting.

BENGHAZI: The latest bout of fighting between rival militias in the capital Tripoli has left 10 people dead.

The medical authorities said 59 people were also wounded when fighting erupted the previous day, taking the death toll to 106 since armed conflict first began there late last month. Friday’s fighting further strained a cease-fire that has been in force since Sept. 4. They said a total of 18 people remain missing.

Libya’s internationally recognized government has called on the UN to take “concrete and effective” action to protect civilians and halt the fighting. The Government of National Accord (GNA) called on the UN mission to “present the Security Council with the reality of the bloody events in Libya so that it can ... protect the lives and property of civilians”.

Libya slid into chaos after the 2011 uprising that overthrew longtime dictator Muammar Qaddafi and led to his death. It’s governed by rival authorities, based in Tripoli and the country’s east, each backed by an array of militias.