Social media must clamp down on hate speech, UN rights boss says

It was now making progress, with better technology to identify hate speech and improved reporting tools. (Shutterstock)
Updated 29 August 2018
0

Social media must clamp down on hate speech, UN rights boss says

  • Facebook had allowed its platform to be used to incite violence against Rohingya
  • Myanmar military officials from the social media website and an Instagram account to prevent the spread of “hate and misinformation” after reviewing the content

GENEVA: Social media, including Facebook , must proactively block content inciting hatred and prevent online campaigns which target minorities, such as those undertaken in Myanmar, the United Nations human rights chief said on Wednesday.
Zeid Ra’ad Al-Hussein, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, was speaking after UN experts accused Myanmar generals of “genocidal intent” and said Facebook had allowed its platform to be used to incite violence against Rohingya.
Facebook said on Monday it was removing several Myanmar military officials from the social media website and an Instagram account to prevent the spread of “hate and misinformation” after reviewing the content.
Zeid, whose spokesman said he has met with major tech companies in Silicon Valley, including Facebook and Google, in recent months, was speaking to a news conference before his four-year term ends on Aug. 31.
Zeid said he didn’t feel Facebook took the issue seriously at first but that the company’s attitude began to change after Yanghee Lee, UN special rapporteur on human rights in Myanmar, told a Geneva press conference in March that Facebook was being used in the country to spread hate speech.
“But it shouldn’t be because the press or the human rights community highlights the problem for them then suddenly to respond. They should be aware of it ahead of time,” he said.
“So I don’t think they should wait until the crisis begins. They should be thinking proactively about what steps they will take to mitigate that,” he added.
Facebook said on Monday that while it was too slow to act in the case of Myanmar, it was now making progress, with better technology to identify hate speech and improved reporting tools.
However, Zeid said there was a danger that social media could be over-regulated in a way that breaches human rights law including the right to freedom of expression.
Tech giants should “keep the broadest space available and open to the exercise of freedom of expression,” relying on international human rights law for regulation, he said.
US President Donald Trump on Tuesday accused Google’s search engine of promoting negative news articles and hiding “fair media” coverage of him, vowing to address the situation without providing evidence or giving details of action he might take.
Trump’s attack against the Alphabet Inc. unit follows a string of grievances against technology companies, including Twitter Inc. and Facebook, which he has accused of silencing conservative voices.


First Saudi woman presents main news bulletin on Saudia TV

Updated 21 September 2018
0

First Saudi woman presents main news bulletin on Saudia TV

JEDDAH: Weam Al-Dakheel has become the first woman to anchor the main evening news bulletin on Saudi Arabia’s main national TV station.
Al-Dakheel presented the news alongside Omar Al-Nashwan on Thursday on Saudia TV channel.
Saudis took to Twitter to celebrate her achievement and the new milestone for Saudi women.
Writer Rayan Al-Jidani said: “Her performance was distinctive in terms of concentration, presence and clear articulation. I wish her more success in her career in media with the national channel @saudiatv.”
Television broadcaster Wael Rafeeq said: “Today, we are very pleased with this great development and quantum leap that the national television is undergoing.”
“It is beautiful to see our national channel in this honorable image. I hope this level of dedication at work is maintained, and developments continue being executed,” Twitter user @abukhaled2030 said.
@aliya_m1khan tweeted: “She is a champion. Such a strong and confident character, a great example.”

Al-Dakheel previously worked for CNBC Arabia and was an intern at Dar Al Hayat Newspaper.
Women have presented the news on other Saudi channels like Al-Ekhbariya for several years.
Their increasing profile in Saudi Arabia’s media comes amid the sweeping social reforms brought in by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, including the lifting of the ban on women drivers.