Bahrain charges 13 with ‘terrorism’

Bahrain’s attorney general said 13 people have been charged with terrorism offenses, over suspected ties to a 2011 protest movement. (Photo / Asharq Al-Awsat)
Updated 30 August 2018
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Bahrain charges 13 with ‘terrorism’

DUBAI: Bahrain’s attorney general on Thursday said 13 people have been charged with terrorism offenses.
“Charges of forming and funding a terrorist cell have been filed against six persons in custody and another seven charged in absentia,” said attorney general Ahmad Al-Hamadi.
Hamadi said the 13 had ties to Bahrain’s so-called “February 14 Coalition” movement that emerged in 2011, which the Kingdom already announced it has ties with Iran.
In January, Bahrain’s Interior Ministry claimed that the group’s Twitter account was an Iranian account and was being managed from Iran, and as a result, a number of individuals were arrested and prosecuted.
The Director-General of Criminal Investigation and Forensic Science said in a statement that the Cyber Crime Directorate had found out that “the account of the terrorist group was being operated and managed from Iran.”
The group will also face charges of targeting police in a trial which is due to open on September 19.
Bahrain accuses Iran of supporting the opposition in a bid to overthrow the government, but Tehran denies involvement.
A key ally of Washington, Bahrain is home to the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet.


US Senate lets $300m arms sale to Bahrain proceed

Senate Democrat Bob Menendez said Bahrain’s “willingness to host our naval forces also places Bahrain at greater risk from attack from Iran and terrorist groups seeking to do harm to the United States.” (AFP)
Updated 17 November 2018
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US Senate lets $300m arms sale to Bahrain proceed

  • Critics of the bill warned that punishment of Bahrain would be misplaced, especially as 7,800 US military personnel are deployed there on a base that hosts the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet

WASHINGTON: The US Senate has rejected a long-shot effort to block $300 million in arms sales to Bahrain, as the bill’s opponents stressed the island nation was a critical ally hosting an American naval base.
The effort, led by Republican Senator Rand Paul, failed as the US Senate voted 77 to 21 to table the measure, essentially killing it.
Critics of the bill warned that punishment of Bahrain would be misplaced, especially as 7,800 US military personnel are deployed there on a base that hosts the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, which helps protect American interests in the region. Bahrain is strategically located between Saudi Arabia and Iran.
Senate Democrat Bob Menendez said Bahrain’s “willingness to host our naval forces also places Bahrain at greater risk from attack from Iran and terrorist groups seeking to do harm to the United States.”
Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, the committee chairman, said Bahrain is home to a naval base with 7,800 US service members protecting American interests and serving as a buffer against the Iranian regime.
He said that blocking an arms sale to an ally over “something that has nothing to do with them, but has something to do with another country is not a pragmatic, nor a sensible step.”