Yemeni minister praises Saudi relief partnership

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Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), holds talks with Yemen’s Minister of Human Rights, Mohammed Askar, in Riyadh. (SPA)
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Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), holds talks with Yemen’s Minister of Human Rights, Mohammed Askar, in Riyadh. (SPA)
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Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), holds talks with Yemen’s Minister of Human Rights, Mohammed Askar, in Riyadh. (SPA)
Updated 30 August 2018
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Yemeni minister praises Saudi relief partnership

JEDDAH: Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), held talks with Yemen’s Minister of Human Rights, Mohammed Askar, on Thursday on relief and humanitarian work provided by KSRelief in Yemen, with 274 projects now in place across the country.
During the meeting In Riyadh, the humanitarian and human rights situation in Yemen were also discussed, including violations committed by the Houthi militias against civilians, such as the bombing of water wells and residential neighborhoods, killing and injuring hundreds of civilians.
The recruitment of children for use as human shields was also condemned.
Al-Rabeeah said KSRelief is keen to cooperate with Yemen’s Ministry of Human Rights to ease the suffering of the Yemeni people and implement programs to support the most affected groups in the country.
“Our work is focused on programs to protect women and children, and rehabilitate children recruited by the Houthi militias.”
Al-Rabeeah said the humanitarian role of KSRelief proves that the Arab coalition is not only a military but also a humanitarian partnership that has been providing food, medicine and clothing to all Yemeni regions for more than three years.
Askar praised the relationship between KSRelief and the ministry, and said their joint programs will have a positive impact on the lives of Yemeni people.
In an earlier interview with Arab News, Askar said: “Iran has succeeded in turning the Houthis into a military tool that threatens international peace and security, especially in the navigational corridors of Yemen such as Bab Al-Mandab and adjoining waters.
“Iran has poured funds and arms in a fervent bid to expand their hegemony in the region. The Iranian intransigence has kept the war raging, which has shattered the lives of Yemenis,” he said.
On Thursday, Al-Rabeeah also met with Saudi Ambassador to Pakistan, Nawaf bin Said Al-Malki to discuss humanitarian affairs.
Al-Malki expressed his admiration for the center’s achievements and humanitarian and relief services, particularly its educational, health and housing projects being implemented in Punjab, Khyber Pakhtun and Balochistan in Pakistan.
KSRelief recently distributed 25 tons of food baskets in the villages of Al-Ja’ada, Al-Fayed, Deir and Bani Fadil of Midi and Hiran directorates in Hajjah governorate, helping 1,980 people.
BACKGROUND
Since its establishment, KSRelief has launched projects worth $70 million in Yemen. The projects aim to help the country amid devastation caused by the Houthi militia.
Earlier, Mohammed Al-Jabir, Saudi ambassador to Yemen, said that the Kingdom’s assistance to Yemen totaled about $10.96 billion.
A report by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs last month showed Saudi Arabia topped donor states to the 2018 UN Yemen Humanitarian Response Plan by donating $530.4 million out of a total of $1.54 billion.
About 2 million Yemenis working in the Kingdom send more than $10 million in remittances to their families in Yemen.
Meanwhile, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Major General Ahmed Al-Shahri, met on Thursday with his Yemeni counterpart, General Taher Al-Aqeeli, in Marib to discuss military developments and the advances of the Yemeni National Army, with the support of the Arab coalition, against the Houthis.
Major General Al-Aqeeli assured that the Arab coalition, led by Saudi Arabia, would continue to support the Yemeni people and its armed forces in battling the militia.
During the meeting, they discussed the mechanisms of cooperation and means of enhancing them.
The two commanders then visited the fighting fronts of the seventh military zone in Nham, east of Sanaa.
Maj. Gen. Al-Shahri conveyed the blessings of King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the Commander of the Joint Forces, on the great victories achieved by the Yemeni National Army in Saada, Hajja, Al-Bayda and on various fronts.


Istanbul vets make city’s stray animals feel at home

Updated 16 min 58 sec ago
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Istanbul vets make city’s stray animals feel at home

  • Visitors to the Istanbul are often surprised to see cats and dogs making themselves at home on the streets
  • Now Istanbul officials are increasing efforts to ensure the good health of the street animals

ISTANBUL: Concerned for the health of a black cat roaming around the university campus where she works, Mevlude dropped off the feline at the veterinary clinic for street animals run by the Istanbul municipality.
Visitors to the Turkish city, who admire its centuries-old mosques and Ottoman palaces, are often surprised to see cats and dogs making themselves at home on the streets, and watch them taking the best seats in cafes and restaurants without a care for the world.
Like Mevlude, many Istanbul residents try to help these four-legged friends in their neighborhood, putting out bowls of food and offering shelter by their doors or windows.
Now Istanbul officials are increasing efforts to ensure the good health of the street animals, and thereby of the residents who come into contact with them.
That care can be seen at the “Vetbus,” where Mevlude brought the black cat because one of its eyes had been closed for several days.
The bus is a mobile clinic stationed for several days in different neighborhoods around the Turkish metropolis.
“We often get in touch with the municipality when we see animals who are in need of care,” Mevlude said, once reassured over the cat’s health whose eyes were now wide open.
“People generally bring the animals that they take care of... so that they are given anti-parasite” treatment, said Nihan Dincer, a veterinarian working for the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IBB).
And “because people are in constant contact with them, they are also protected,” she added.
The attention given by Istanbul residents to caring for street animals partly “comes from the Islamic tradition, and part of it... comes from the structuring of the public space in the Ottoman Empire,” Mine Yildirim, a doctoral candidate at the New School for Social Research in New York, said.
In Ottoman times, people moved between home, the mosque and the market. The streets were the space for the dogs, the researcher said.
Then in the early 20th century there were extermination policies like in the West, and even in the 1990s city officials would put poison on the streets to kill animals, said Yildirim, coordinator of the collective “Dort Ayakli Sehir” (Four-legged City).
But an animal protection law passed in 2004 forced municipalities to take care of street animals.
In Istanbul, as well as the mobile clinic, IBB maintains six health centers.
The aim is to vaccinate, sterilize and take care of around 130,000 dogs and 165,000 cats who live on the streets, according to the municipality.
The animals, fitted with a microchip, are then taken back to where they were found, except those which are adopted by individuals during their stay at the health centers.
Due to the development of these services, the municipality has cared for 73,608 animals in 2018 — that compares with only 2,470 back in 2004.
There hasn’t been a single case of rabies in Istanbul since 2016, according to the municipality which employs 100 veterinarians and veterinary technicians.
While the municipality refused to say how much the services cost, Agriculture and Forests Minister Bekir Pakdemirli said last month that his ministry has provided 31 million Turkish lira (around $6 million) of support to local authorities across Turkey for the care of street animals between 2009 and 2018.
“If people knew how much money was spent on these services, maybe people would be more upset, but these figures are not disclosed,” Yildirim commented.
While animals living on Istanbul’s streets are often well fed, in the forests surrounding the city, “animals don’t have a place to feed themselves,” Umut Demir, also a veterinarian at IBB, said during a patrol in Belgrade Forest on Istanbul’s European side.
So around a ton of food is distributed each day by vans dispatched full of dry food, toward which dogs come running after hearing the horn.
According to Tugce Demirlek, chief veterinarian at Sultangazi district health center, the fact that the animals are well fed and cared for ensures that they are calm and limits any aggressive behavior.
But the number of dogs has remained fairly stable in the past few years despite sterilization efforts. “We sterilize them systematically, but the animals that we do not catch continue to reproduce,” she explained.
Puppies continue to be born every year in Istanbul, like a small golden puppy only 40 days old, that was found alone, whimpering, on the side of a road.
Once examined and chipped, the dog is put up for adoption, its picture displayed in the Vetbus.
One recent afternoon, the puppy attracted a lot of attention, but it still has not found a home.
“We will try our luck again tomorrow,” Dincer said.