Seven hurt in Houthi attack targeting Najran

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Saudi Arabian air defense forces intercepted a ballistic missile fired by Houthi militia from Yemen toward Najran on Thursday evening. (Reuters)
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Firing of ballistic missiles at populated cities and villages is contrary to international law. (SPA)
Updated 31 August 2018
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Seven hurt in Houthi attack targeting Najran

  • The missile was part of a flurry of attacks on the Kingdom in recent weeks
  • The Arab coalition fighting the Houthi militia in Yemen has repeatedly stressed the involvement of Iran

JEDDAH: JEDDAH: Seven people were hurt when debris from an intercepted missile fell on residential areas in the southern Saudi province of Najran, near the border with Yemen, on Thursday night.
The missile was launched from Saadah governorate of Yemen by Houthi militia and intercepted by Royal Saudi Air Defense forces, Arab coalition spokesperson Col. Turki Al-Maliki said.
Two Saudi women, two Bangladeshis and one Indian sustained minor injuries, he said.
“The hostile action taken by the Houthi forces proves the continued involvement of the Iranian regime in supporting Houthi armed groups in clear defiance of UN Resolution 2216 and Resolution 2231,” said Al-Maliki.
He condemned the firing of ballistic missiles at populated cities and villages, which is contrary to international law.
The coalition has repeatedly stressed the involvement of Iran in supporting the Houthis, supplying the militia with missiles to threaten Saudi Arabia’s regional security.
Houthi aggression in recent months has led to a global outcry with a number of countries and organizations condemning the launch of ballistic missiles targeting the Kingdom.

 


Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, said Saudi Arabia's foreign minister. (AFP)
Updated 16 November 2018
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Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

  • Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, says Saudi FM
  • Al-Jubeir: Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict

RIYADH: The Saudi-led coalition is working with UN envoy Martin Griffith to reach a political solution to the conflict in Yemen based on UN Security Council resolution 2216, the Gulf Initiative and the outcomes of Yemeni national dialogue, the Saudi foreign minister said on Thursday. 

“Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, and the solution should lead to the restoration of legitimacy in Yemen,” said Adel Al-Jubeir.

“We support a peaceful solution in Yemen. We support the efforts of the UN envoy for the Yemeni cause,” he added.

“We are committed to providing all humanitarian support to our brothers there. We are also working on the post-war reconstruction of Yemen.” The Kingdom supports the envoy’s efforts to hold negotiations at the end of November, added Al-Jubeir.

Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict, he said.

In contrast, Houthi militias are imposing restrictions on Yemeni cities and villages, leading to starvation, he added. 

They are also seizing humanitarian aid and preventing Yemenis from getting cholera vaccinations, Al-Jubeir said. 

The Houthis fire ballistic missiles indiscriminately at Saudi Arabia, use children as fighters and plant mines across Yemen, he added. 

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, he said.

Saudi Arabia did not want the conflict in Yemen; it was imposed on the Kingdom, Al-Jubeir added. 

Saudi Arabia worked with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states to develop the Gulf Initiative. 

This led to a transition from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to the internationally recognized government headed by current President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

The Kingdom also worked to develop Yemeni national dialogue that led to a Yemeni vision regarding the country’s future.

A new Yemeni constitution was about to be drafted when the Houthis seized much of the country, including the capital. 

Yemen’s legitimate government requested support, and the Saudi-led coalition responded under Article 51 of the UN Charter.