What We Are Reading Today: Midlife: A Philosophical Guide by Kieran Setiya

Updated 31 August 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Midlife: A Philosophical Guide by Kieran Setiya

  • Midlife combines imaginative ideas, surprising insights, and practical advice

How can you reconcile yourself with the lives you will never lead, with possibilities foreclosed, and with nostalgia for lost youth? How can you accept the failings of the past, the sense of futility in the tasks that consume the present, and the prospect of death that blights the future? In this self-help book with a difference, Kieran Setiya confronts the inevitable challenges of adulthood and middle age, showing how philosophy can help you thrive.

You will learn why missing out might be a good thing, how options are overrated, and when you should be glad you made a mistake. You will be introduced to philosophical consolations for mortality. And you will learn what it would mean to live in the present, how it could solve your midlife crisis, and why meditation helps.

Ranging from Aristotle, Schopenhauer, and John Stuart Mill to Virginia Woolf and Simone de Beauvoir, as well as drawing on Setiya’s own experience, Midlife combines imaginative ideas, surprising insights, and practical advice. Writing with wisdom and wit, Setiya makes a wry but passionate case for philosophy as a guide to life. Kieran Setiya is professor of philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

He is the author of Reasons without Rationalism (Princeton) and Knowing Right from Wrong. He lives in Brookline, Massachusetts, with his wife and son.


What We Are Reading Today: A Good American Family

Updated 16 July 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: A Good American Family

Author: DAVID MARANISS

A Good American Family is biographer David Maraniss’s look at a subject very close to his heart: His father.
“This is an eye-opening book about an American family that was affected by the Red Scare of the 1940s and 1950s,” said a review in goodreads.com.
The author’s father was accused of being a communist. The book traces the effects of this on the Maraniss family and sets the larger context of the Red Scare, according to the review.
The author “does a great job of bringing the impact on people and families labeled as ‘unamerican’ home to the reader,” the review added.
In a review for The New York Times, critic Kevin Baker said: “For all of Maraniss’s research, a mystery remains at the heart of A Good American Family: Just what were his parents, and especially his father, doing in the Communist Party in the first place? This is a question Maraniss cannot answer, because his parents, for one reason or another — shame? embarrassment? an effort to spare their children? — rarely spoke of it.”