Egypt raises foreigners’ passes prices to Cairo, Luxor sites

An Egyptian labourer stands next to an ancient Egyptian mural found at the newly discovered "Kampp 161" tomb at Draa Abul Naga necropolis on the west Nile bank of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
Updated 31 August 2018
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Egypt raises foreigners’ passes prices to Cairo, Luxor sites

CAIRO: Egypt has raised the price of passes that allow foreign tourists entry into archaeological sites and museums in Cairo and Luxor.
Thursday’s statement by the Antiquities Ministry says the hikes, which take effect Nov. 1, affect the Cairo Pass and the standard Luxor Pass. Each will cost $100, up from $80, for regular visitors and $50, instead of $40, for students.
It says the premium Luxor Pass, which includes access to the 19th-dynasty tombs of pharaoh Seti I and queen Nefertari, will cost $200, up from $160 and students will pay $100 instead of $80.
Cash-strapped Egypt has been struggling to spur its tourism industry decimated by political turmoil following a 2011 uprising. It has sought to lure tourists back with multi-million dollar campaigns, touting new archaeological discoveries and boosting security around historical sites.


Malaysia welcomes its first durian-friendly hotel

An overview of the Durian Research Center. (AN photo)
Updated 16 July 2019
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Malaysia welcomes its first durian-friendly hotel

  • Tan sees the resort’s agritourism ecosystem as a long-term goal toward creating a platform for durian research and cultivation

KUALA LUMPUR: Durians are known for their distinct, pungent smell, which many foreigners describe as a combination of rotten onions and old socks. As such, most hotels in Asia forbid the fruit on their premises.
But with the rising popularity of durians among locals and foreign tourists, Malaysia is welcoming its first durian-friendly hotel and resort.
Situated an hour from Kuala Lumpur’s city center, the beautiful, scenic Bangi Golf Resort includes a hotel overlooking a golf course, and an agriculture farm.
“When you first go into any hotels, you usually see the signs ‘durian is not allowed’ or ‘durian is forbidden’,” said Tan Ban Keat, director of the resort. “We soften the tone for the hotel to be ‘durians are allowed in durian-friendly zones’.”
Hotel patrons can buy, eat and bring durians to designated zones throughout the resort.
“We’re actually the first hotel to practice that,” said Tan, adding that he does not believe the move will prompt other hotels in Malaysia to follow suit.
“It doesn’t do anything to their business. We do it because we grow durians on the premises. We have the annual durian festival … and we’ll include the Durian Research Center in the near future,” he said.

FASTFACT

Musang Kings are considered premium durians due to their intense yet well-balanced, custardy sweet taste. They are the premier durians for export to China and other overseas markets.

Tan expressed his hope that the center, which is under construction, will become a premier research hub for better durian breeds.
“I hope to create a Super Musang King,” he said. Musang Kings are considered premium durians due to their intense yet well-balanced, custardy sweet taste. They are the premier durians for export to China and other overseas markets.
Tan sees the resort’s agritourism ecosystem as a long-term goal toward creating a platform for durian research and cultivation.
“These durian-friendly zones are created to be a platform for agriculture. Durians have a place in many people’s hearts. They’re a national treasure,” he added.