Egypt raises foreigners’ passes prices to Cairo, Luxor sites

An Egyptian labourer stands next to an ancient Egyptian mural found at the newly discovered "Kampp 161" tomb at Draa Abul Naga necropolis on the west Nile bank of the southern Egyptian city of Luxor. (AFP)
Updated 31 August 2018
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Egypt raises foreigners’ passes prices to Cairo, Luxor sites

CAIRO: Egypt has raised the price of passes that allow foreign tourists entry into archaeological sites and museums in Cairo and Luxor.
Thursday’s statement by the Antiquities Ministry says the hikes, which take effect Nov. 1, affect the Cairo Pass and the standard Luxor Pass. Each will cost $100, up from $80, for regular visitors and $50, instead of $40, for students.
It says the premium Luxor Pass, which includes access to the 19th-dynasty tombs of pharaoh Seti I and queen Nefertari, will cost $200, up from $160 and students will pay $100 instead of $80.
Cash-strapped Egypt has been struggling to spur its tourism industry decimated by political turmoil following a 2011 uprising. It has sought to lure tourists back with multi-million dollar campaigns, touting new archaeological discoveries and boosting security around historical sites.


Paris official seeks to outlaw Airbnb rentals in city center

Updated 06 September 2018
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Paris official seeks to outlaw Airbnb rentals in city center

  • With some 60,000 apartments on offer in the city, Paris is the biggest market for Airbnb
  • The administration of Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo has already taken action against Airbnb and others

PARIS: The Paris city council member in charge of housing said Thursday that he would propose outlawing home rentals via Airbnb and other websites in the city center, accusing the service of forcing residents out of the French capital.
Ian Brossat said that he would also seek to prohibit the purchase of secondary residences in Paris, saying such measures were necessary to keep the city from becoming an “open-air museum.”
“One residence out of every four no longer houses Parisians,” said Brossat, who is expected to head the Communist party list for European Parliament elections next year.
With some 60,000 apartments on offer in the city, Paris is the biggest market for Airbnb, which like other home-sharing platforms has come under increasing pressure from cities which claim it drives up rents for locals.
“Do we want Paris to be a city which the middle classes can afford, or do we want it to be a playground for Saudi or American billionaires?” he said.
Brossat has had Airbnb and its rivals in his sights for years, and recently published a book assailing the US giant titled “Airbnb, or the Uberised City.”
He wants to forbid any short-term tourist rentals of entire apartments in the First, Second, Third and Fourth Arrondissements of Paris, home to some of the world’s most popular sites including the Cathedral of Notre-Dame and the Louvre museum.
“If we don’t do anything, there won’t be any more locals: Like on the Ile Saint-Louis, we’ll end up with a drop in the number of residents and food shops turned into clothing or souvenir stores,” he said, referring to the Seine island in the shadow of the Notre-Dame cathedral.
“We’ll be living in an open-air museum,” he added.
Brossat hopes the measures will be included in a law aimed at overhauling France’s real estate laws to be debated this fall.
The administration of Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo has already taken action against Airbnb and others, requiring homeowners to register with the city and limiting the number of rentals to 120 nights a year.
Last month the city said the total amount of fines levied against home rental platforms rose to €1.38 million ($1.60 million) from January to August 15, compared with €1.3 million for 2017 as a whole.
Its crackdown echoes those in other hot tourist destinations including Amsterdam, Barcelona and Berlin.
Last month Airbnb sued the city of New York after it passed a law forcing home-sharing platforms to disclose data about their hosts, calling it a campaign “funded by the city’s powerful hotel lobby.”