UK minister to discuss Iran’s destabilizing activities in Syria, Yemen

Junior Foreign Minister Alistair Burt arrived in Tehran on Friday. (AFP/File Photo)
Updated 31 August 2018
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UK minister to discuss Iran’s destabilizing activities in Syria, Yemen

  • Burt will discuss Iran’s “destabilizing role” in the ongoing conflicts in Syria and Yemen, as well as the plight of dual nationals detained in Iran
  • His visit comes as the EU tries to keep the deal alive

JEDDAH: Junior Foreign Minister Alistair Burt arrived in Tehran on Friday to discuss the future of Iran’s international nuclear deal, in the first visit to the country by a British minister to Iran since US President Donald Trump withdrew from the 2015 agreement.

His visit comes as the EU tries to keep the deal alive.

Burt will also discuss Iran’s “destabilizing role” in the ongoing conflicts in Syria and Yemen, as well as the plight of dual nationals detained in Iran.

In a statement ahead of the visit, Burt said: “During my visit … I will stress that Iran’s ballistic missile program and its destabilizing activities in the Middle East must be addressed. I will also use the opportunity of my visit to push for the resolution we all want to see in the cases of the British dual nationals detained in Iran.”

Britain is seeking the release of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, a project manager with the Thomson Reuters Foundation. She was arrested in April 2016 at Tehran’s airport as she was heading back to Britain with her daughter, now aged four, after a family visit.

Burt will meet Iranian ministers, including his counterpart Abbas Araghchi, and NGOs during his two-day visit.

“As long as Iran meets its commitments under the deal, we remain committed to it as we believe it is the best way to ensure a safe, secure future for the region,” said Burt.


Tunisia’s premier unlikely to push reform as polls loom

Chahed has gathered enough support in Parliament to stave off a possible vote of no confidence. (Reuters)
Updated 22 September 2018
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Tunisia’s premier unlikely to push reform as polls loom

  • By surviving for more than two years, Chahed has become the longest-serving of Tunisia’s nine prime ministers since the Arab Spring in 2011
  • Western partners see him as the best guarantee of stability in an infant democracy that they are desperate to shore up

Tunisian Prime Minister Youssef Chahed has survived attempts by his own party and unions to force him out but, with elections looming, looks less and less able to enact the economic reforms that have so far secured IMF support for an ailing economy.

Last week, the Nidaa Tounes party suspended Chahed after a campaign by the party chairman, who is the son of President Beji Caid Essebsi.

Chahed has gathered enough support in Parliament to stave off a possible vote of no confidence by working with the co-ruling Islamist Ennahda party and a number of other lawmakers including 10 Nidaa Tounes rebels. But his political capital is now badly depleted.

By surviving for more than two years, Chahed has become the longest-serving of Tunisia’s nine prime ministers since the Arab Spring in 2011.

In that time, he has pushed through austerity measures and structural reforms such as cutting fuel subsidies that have helped to underpin a $2.8 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and other financial support.

Western partners see him as the best guarantee of stability in an infant democracy that they are desperate to shore up, not least as a bulwark against extremism.

Yet the economy, and living standards, continue to suffer: inflation and unemployment are at record levels, and goods such as medicines or even staples such as milk are often in short supply, or simply unaffordable to many.

And in recent months, the 43-year old former agronomist’s main focus has been to hold on to his job as his party starts to look to its ratings ahead of presidential and parliamentary polls in a year’s time.

The breathing space he has won is at best temporary; while propping him up for now, Ennahda says it will not back him to be prime minister again after the elections.

And, more pressingly, the powerful UGTT labor union on Thursday called a public sector strike for Oct. 24 to protest against Chahed’s privatization plans.

This month, the government once more raised petrol and electricity prices to secure the next tranche of loans, worth $250 million, which the IMF is expected to approve next week.

But the IMF also wants it to cut a public wage bill that takes up 15 percent of GDP, one of the world’s highest rates.