What We Are Reading Today: The Euro and the Battle of Ideas

Updated 01 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Euro and the Battle of Ideas

Why is Europe’s great monetary endeavor, the euro, in trouble? A string of economic difficulties in Greece, Ireland, Spain, Italy, and other eurozone nations has left observers wondering whether the currency union can survive. In this book, Markus Brunnermeier, Harold James, and Jean-Pierre Landau argue that the core problem with the euro lies in the philosophical differences between the founding countries of the eurozone, particularly Germany and France, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. But the authors also show how these seemingly incompatible differences can be reconciled to ensure europe’s survival.
As the authors demonstrate, Germany, a federal state with strong regional governments, saw the Maastricht Treaty, the framework for the Euro, as a set of rules. France, on the other hand, with a more centralized system of government, saw the framework as flexible, to be overseen by governments.

— Markus K. Brunnermeier, Harold James & Jean-Pierre Landau


What We Are Reading Today: Grace Will Lead Us Home

Updated 21 July 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Grace Will Lead Us Home

Author: Jennifer Berry Hawes

Grace Will Lead Us Home is a deeply moving work of narrative nonfiction on the tragic shootings in 2015 at the Mother Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina.
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jennifer Berry Hawes provides a definitive account of the tragedy’s aftermath.
“With unprecedented access to the grieving families and other key figures, Hawes offers a nuanced and moving portrait of the events and emotions that emerged in the massacre’s wake,” said a review in goodreads.com.
It said “Grace Will Lead Us Home — an unforgettable and deeply human portrait of grief, faith, and forgiveness — is destined to be a classic in the finest tradition of journalism.”
Chris Lebron said in a review for The New York Times: “In Grace Will Lead Us Home, the sorrow of the massacre’s three survivors, and that of the relatives left to mourn the dead, is vividly rendered but not to the point of caricature. Similarly admirable are moments when she depicts the difficulties faced by Roof’s family without compelling us to feel for them what we feel for the victims and their relatives.”