What We Are Reading Today: The Euro and the Battle of Ideas

Updated 01 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Euro and the Battle of Ideas

Why is Europe’s great monetary endeavor, the euro, in trouble? A string of economic difficulties in Greece, Ireland, Spain, Italy, and other eurozone nations has left observers wondering whether the currency union can survive. In this book, Markus Brunnermeier, Harold James, and Jean-Pierre Landau argue that the core problem with the euro lies in the philosophical differences between the founding countries of the eurozone, particularly Germany and France, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. But the authors also show how these seemingly incompatible differences can be reconciled to ensure europe’s survival.
As the authors demonstrate, Germany, a federal state with strong regional governments, saw the Maastricht Treaty, the framework for the Euro, as a set of rules. France, on the other hand, with a more centralized system of government, saw the framework as flexible, to be overseen by governments.

— Markus K. Brunnermeier, Harold James & Jean-Pierre Landau


What We Are Reading Today: The Best Writing on Mathematics

Updated 17 November 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Best Writing on Mathematics

Author: Mircea Pitici

This annual anthology brings together the year’s finest mathematics writing from around the world.
Featuring promising new voices alongside some of the foremost names in the field, The Best Writing on Mathematics 2018 makes available to a wide audience many pieces not easily found anywhere else — and you don’t need to be a mathematician to enjoy them, according to a review on the Princeton University Press website.
These essays delve into the history, philosophy, teaching, and everyday aspects of math, offering surprising insights into its nature, meaning, and practice—and taking readers behind the scenes of today’s hottest mathematical debates.
James Grime shows how to build subtly mischievous dice for playing slightly unfair games and Michael Barany traces how our appreciation of the societal importance of mathematics has developed since World War II. This must-have anthology includes an introduction by the editor and a bibliography of other notable pieces on mathematics.