Oman calls out expat teachers who breach private tuition ban

Some teachers continue to defy the ban. (File/Shutterstock)
Updated 03 September 2018
0

Oman calls out expat teachers who breach private tuition ban

  • Teachers in Oman are reminded that private tuition is banned
  • Some parents still in the country still pay for the service despite the ban

DUBAI: Expat teachers in Oman have been warned they face “severe punishment” if they continue to breach the ban on private tuition, Times of Oman reported.

There are still Indian teachers who engage in the illegal practice – usually from their homes - despite private tuition being banned in the country, Oman education adviser M P Vinoba was quoted as saying.

“All principals are requested to ensure that teachers of their respective schools, right from kindergarten to class XII are not engaged in giving private tuition and private teaching activities with immediate effect,” said Vinoba.

But some parents, who send their children to private tutors, have voiced concerns over the ongoing ban.

“While we appreciate this step taken by the school board, we are equally worried for our children as their exams are around the corner,” one parent said.

Another concerned parent said the government should make the provision for extra tuition.

“Schools should have the facility of providing such classes post school hours. Only then, will this regulation help. Otherwise, it is just putting more pressure on students and the parents as well.”

But a senior member of the Indian School administrative in Oman said schools had taken necessary measures to ensure the quality of education given to their students.

“I ask the community to not panic, because the schooling system has taken adequate steps and is equipped enough to handle this situation.”

The source said some Indian schools had started to introduce special classes called ‘gurukul’, a new concept that allows students to attend evening classes, especially those who are having problems grasping important lessons.


400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

Updated 25 September 2018
0

400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

  • Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak

CASCAIS, Portugal: Archaeologists searching Portugal’s coast have found a 400-year-old shipwreck believed to have sunk near Lisbon after returning from India laden with spices, specialists said on Monday.
“From a heritage perspective, this is the discovery of the decade,” project director Jorge Freire said. “In Portugal, this is the most important find of all time.”
In and around the shipwreck, 40 feet (12 meters) below the surface, divers found spices, nine bronze cannons engraved with the Portuguese coat of arms, Chinese ceramics and cowry shells, a type of currency used to trade slaves during the colonial era.
Found on Sept. 3 off the coast of Cascais, a resort town on the outskirts of Lisbon, the shipwreck and its objects were “very well-preserved,” said Freire.
Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak.
In 1994, Portuguese ship Our Lady of the Martyrs was discovered near Fort of Sao Juliao da Barra, a military defense complex near Cascais.
“For a long time, specialists have considered the mouth of the Tagus river a hotspot for shipwrecks,” said Minister of Culture Luis Mendes. “This discovery came to prove it.”
The wreck was found as part of a 10-year-old archaeological project backed by the municipal council of Cascais, the navy, the Portuguese government and Nova University of Lisbon.