Spacenow partners with Dubai’s SEED Group

Leading the signing was SEED Group CEO Hisham Al-Gurg, seated left.
Updated 04 September 2018
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Spacenow partners with Dubai’s SEED Group

The World’s first space-sharing platform from Australia, spacenow.com, has signed a regional partnership agreement with Dubai’s SEED Group, a group of diversified companies owned and chaired by the private office of Sheikh Saeed bin Ahmed Al-Maktoum. Leading the signing was Hisham Al-Gurg, CEO of the private office of Al-Maktoum and SEED Group.

Spacenow is a platform that allows property and site owners to activate and monetize their underutilized space — from studios and gardens, to wall space and event venues — and enables entrepreneurs and businesses to access that space on a long- or short-term basis, from as little as just one hour. It was created in November 2016 by four Australian entrepreneurs in the real estate, technology, finance and creative sectors: Daniel Gunning, Barrett Ovens, Baydr Strik, and Nick Leary. The company was born to meet the demands of the fast-moving, disruptive world of the sharing economy — a $100 billion market that is estimated to more than triple to reach $330 billion in 2025. Spacenow now operates in 52 cities globally. 

“We are delighted with the partnership we have founded with SEED Group Dubai to establish Spacenow’s Dubai office and roll out our expansion plan throughout the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. This will become the first multi-space, short-term rental platform in the region and we are very eager to start operation,” said Gunning, Spacenow’s CEO and founder.

“The UAE and indeed the whole region has a great range of spaces and locations just waiting to be activated. We are proud to partner with Spacenow and support this unique platform. It is a smart initiative and marries well with Dubai’s ambition to be a model city of the future, and to continue attracting innovation and entrepreneurship to our city and our nation,” said Al-Gurg.


New J-Clinic to harness machine learning tech

Updated 25 September 2018
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New J-Clinic to harness machine learning tech

MIT and Community Jameel, the social enterprise organization founded and chaired by Mohammed Abdul Latif Jameel ‘78, launched the Abdul Latif Jameel Clinic for Machine Learning in Health (J-Clinic) on Tuesday. This is the fourth major collaborative effort between MIT and Community Jameel.
J-Clinic, a key part of the MIT Quest for Intelligence, will focus on developing machine learning technologies to revolutionize the prevention, detection, and treatment of disease. It will concentrate on creating and commercializing high-precision, affordable, and scalable machine learning technologies in areas of health care ranging from diagnostics to pharmaceuticals, with three main areas of focus:
l Preventative medicine methods and technologies with the potential to change the course of non-infectious disease by stopping it in its tracks.
l Cost-effective diagnostic tests that may be able to both detect and alleviate health problems.
l Drug discovery and development to enable faster and cheaper discovery, development, and manufacture of new pharmaceuticals, particularly those targeted for individually customized therapies.
J-Clinic’s holistic approach will utilize MIT’s expertise in cellular and medical biology, computer science, engineering, and the social sciences, among other areas.
“The health care system has no shortage of data,” said MIT President L. Rafael Reif. “But it has far too little access to the kinds of tools and experts who can translate population-level data into clinical insights that could make it possible to tune care precisely for individuals. Building on MIT’s deep expertise in fields from cancer to neuroscience, and our longstanding connections to Boston’s world-class medical community, J-Clinic offers an accelerated path to creating new technologies that could help make health care more effective everywhere — from villages in developing nations to major teaching hospitals.”
“The J-Clinic will positively impact the world by accelerating the creation of machine learning technologies and algorithms that will make preventing, detecting, and treating disease more precise, affordable, and personalized,” said Anantha P. Chandrakasan, dean of the MIT School of Engineering, and Vannevar Bush, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, who will serve as J-Clinic’s chair. “It will be a truly multifaceted effort that amplifies synergies between the life sciences and the latest research in human and machine intelligence. J-Clinic will inspire innovation for the betterment of humanity.”
“Channeling MIT’s machine learning expertise into health care will transform medical outcomes for people around the world,” said Fady Jameel, president of Community Jameel International. “Health care has been an important sphere of activity for Community Jameel since our earliest days, from founding the first nonprofit hospital for physical rehabilitation in Saudi Arabia, to partnering with the King Salman Center for Disability Research. J-Clinic continues our journey of supporting cutting-edge research and driving innovation in health care, in Saudi Arabia and around the whole world.”