Coalition suggests possible civilian casualties in Aug. 23 anti-Houthi strike

Arab Coalition spokesperson Colonel Turki Al-Maliki. (SPA)
Updated 06 September 2018
0

Coalition suggests possible civilian casualties in Aug. 23 anti-Houthi strike

  • All documents relating to this incident have been handed over to Joint Incidents Assessment Team

JEDDAH: The coalition supporting Yemen's  legitimate government said Wednesday that it has passed on for assessment its review suggesting possible civilian casualties in an Aug. 23 strike targeting terrorists in Hodeidah.
“There might have been collateral damage and civilian casualties” in the Aug. 23 incident, which was targeting members of the terrorist Iranian-Houthi militia in Durayhimi directorate, coalition spokesman Col. Turki Al-Malki said in a statement carried by the Saudi Press Agency (SPA).
“All documents relating to this incident have been handed over to Joint Incidents Assessment Team (JIAT) pending assessment and announcement of results,” Al-Malki said.
The official spokesman reaffirmed the commitment of the coalition in applying the highest standards of targeting, the SPA report said.
Earlier, the JIAT called for a review of the rules of engagement by the coalition as it concluded that dozens of civilians, some of them children, were killed in an anti-Houthi strike on a bus in Saada, Yemen on Aug. 9
Mansour Ahmed Al-Mansour, JIAT legal adviser, said the strike had been based on intelligence indicating that the bus was carrying Houthi leaders, a legitimate military target, but the mission went awry due to delays in execution of the strike and failure to receive a no-strike order.
A report by the International Committee for the Red Cross on the Aug. 9 incident said at least 29 children were killed and dozens more injured when the bus was hit in Dahyan area in Saada province.
The coalition apologized for the failed strike, promised to review its rules of engagement, hold those at fault accountable and compensate the victims.
The US has hailed the announcement as a proper step in correcting mistakes that have fueled criticisms against the otherwise legitimate mission of the Saudi-led coalition.


Major projects, investments worth over $685bn unveiled on Saudi National Day

A photo taken on July 5, 2018, shows Bader al-Ajmi, 38,(L) owner of "One Way Burger" serving customers from his truck at a main street in the capital Riyadh. (AFP)
Updated 22 September 2018
0

Major projects, investments worth over $685bn unveiled on Saudi National Day

  • The private sector’s contribution to the GDP at constant prices doubled to around SR1236.6 million in 2017

JEDDAH: A major economic boost in the form of 10 major projects and investments exceeding SR685 billion ($183 billion) were unveiled as celebrations of the 88th Saudi National Day got under way.
The Council of Saudi Chambers released a report focusing on great economic achievements in 2017.
These projects reflect the Kingdom’s vision under the wise leadership of King Salman and that of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to provide a brighter future through diversifying sources of national income, tackling environmental challenges and increasing investment and prosperity.
The report summarized the most important events and economic developments in the Kingdom over the past year. These include the lifting of the ban on women driving in June, and the establishment of the General Authority for Cyber Security, in addition to the numerous royal decrees providing financial support to Saudis.
It also noted the important decisions related to the Saudi business sector. These include the launch of a private sector incentive program with a value of SR72 billion, the privatization of 10 government sectors and the establishment of the General Authority for Real Estate. The private sector is still showing a strong performance as an efficient partner in the inclusive development process and in the achievement of the Kingdom’s 2030 Vision, the report noted, as it contributes 39 percent to the Saudi gross domestic product (GDP).
The private sector’s contribution to the GDP at constant prices doubled to around SR1236.6 million in 2017. There has been increased contribution to GDP from non-oil private sector streams.
The private sector also witnessed an increase in the number of workers, in its capital, in the number of shares on the Saudi market, in the cumulative number of establishments operating in the Kingdom, and in non-oil exports.
Continued growth of the private sector was attributed by the report to the Saudi government’s support. This support comes through initiatives such as the removal of obstacles to financial development, improvements to the working environment and policies adopted to boost investment.
It also reviewed the private sector’s efforts to support diversification of the economy and lower unemployment rates.
The importance of the measures taken to prioritize the employment of qualified Saudi workers over the employment of expatriates in the private sector were stressed, as well as the sector’s role in providing education and health services.