Swimsuit-less Miss America enters second day of prelims

Miss Florida Taylor Tyson, left, won the talent competition for a piano rendition of “Mephisto’s Waltz” by Lizst while Miss Wisconsin Tianna Vanderhei won the onstage interview competition for her comments on higher education. (AP)
Updated 06 September 2018
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Swimsuit-less Miss America enters second day of prelims

  • ‘It’s sad that it’s gone, but I understand the reasons it’s gone’
  • ‘People are going to get to see what Miss America is all about with these changes’

ATLANTIC CITY, New Jersey: The second night of preliminary competition in the swimsuit-less Miss America competition will be held Thursday night in Atlantic City.
Contestants from Florida and Wisconsin picked up wins Wednesday in the first night of preliminary competition.
Miss Florida Taylor Tyson won the talent competition for a piano rendition of “Mephisto’s Waltz” by Lizst.
Miss Wisconsin Tianna Vanderhei won the onstage interview competition for her comments on how higher education should be more affordable and more widely accessible.
Both said they were excited to be the first winners in the revamped Miss America competition, which has generated controversy for its decision to eliminate swimsuits — a staple of the pageant since it began 98 years ago in Atlantic City.
“Swimsuit is behind us,” Vanderhei said after Wednesday night’s competition ended. “It’s sad that it’s gone, but I understand the reasons it’s gone.”
“People are going to get to see what Miss America is all about with these changes,” Tyson added.
The preliminaries began amid a revolt by state pageant officials unhappy with the way the decision to drop swimsuits was made, and who are demanding that top leadership, including chairwoman Gretchen Carlson, step down.
The current Miss America, Cara Mund, has accused Carlson and CEO Regina Hopper of bullying and silencing her — allegations the two officials deny.
Mund did not reference the controversy in her opening remarks, which followed a prolonged standing ovation. But she did pay tribute to local and state officials without mentioning national ones.
“This only exists because of our volunteers,” she said. “We wouldn’t have any organization if it weren’t for them.”
A spokesman for opponents of the current leadership said 46 state organizations have signed letters calling for Carlson and Hopper to resign; only Arkansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nevada and Vermont have not signed.
The first of three nights of preliminary competition began with a big change: In past years, one talent and one swimsuit winner were named in each of the three preliminary nights.
This year, instead of a swimsuit winner, the winner of an onstage interview will be named.
Scholarships totaling nearly $506,000 will be awarded, including $50,000 for the new Miss America; $25,000 for the first runner-up; $20,000 for the second runner-up; $15,000 for the third runner-up, and $10,000 for the fourth runner up.
The third and final night of preliminaries will be held Friday.
The next Miss America will be crowned Sunday night in Atlantic City.


What We Are Reading Today: Racial Migrations by Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof

Updated 19 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Racial Migrations by Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof

  • In Racial Migrations, Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof presents a vivid portrait of these largely forgotten migrant revolutionaries

In the late 19th century, a small group of Cubans and Puerto Ricans of African descent settled in the segregated tenements of New York City.

At an immigrant educational society in Greenwich Village, these early Afro-Latino New Yorkers taught themselves to be poets, journalists, and revolutionaries, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

At the same time, these individuals — including Rafael Serra, a cigar maker, writer, and politician; Sotero Figueroa, a typesetter, editor, and publisher; and Gertrudis Heredia, one of the first women of African descent to study midwifery at the University of Havana — built a political network and articulated an ideal of revolutionary nationalism centered on the projects of racial and social justice.

These efforts were critical to the poet and diplomat José Martí’s writings about race and his bid for leadership among Cuban exiles, and to the later struggle to create space for black political participation in the Cuban Republic.

In Racial Migrations, Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof presents a vivid portrait of these largely forgotten migrant revolutionaries.