What We Are Reading: Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter

Updated 06 September 2018
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What We Are Reading: Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter

  • Using multiple examples from Trump’s campaign, Adams outlines the methods and tools he sees as typical traits of master persuaders
  • Adams offers readers insights into how Trump persuaded the US public, kept the spotlight on himself, and maintained the topic of conversation of his choosing

Scott Adams uses his artistic touch and sense of humor to give readers an enjoyable, thought-provoking guide to the art of persuasion in his 2017 nonfiction book “Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter.”

In 2016, he predicted that Donald Trump would win the US presidency when few others considered him a serious contender. What had Adams seen that many experts missed?

Using multiple examples from Trump’s campaign, Adams outlines the methods and tools he sees as typical traits of master persuaders. 

For instance, he discusses why it is highly effective to create a visual image for one’s target audience, such as the “big, beautiful wall” that Trump consistently referred to. 

It captured voters’ attention with a simple solution to the complex problem of illegal immigration and border control.

Adams offers readers insights into how Trump persuaded the US public, kept the spotlight on himself, and maintained the topic of conversation of his choosing. 

Using these tactical skills and more, he was able to essentially talk his way into the White House.


What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

Updated 21 April 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe by Sheri Berman

In Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe, Sheri Berman traces the long history of democracy in its cradle, Europe. 

In her study of European political development over more than 200 years, Berman, a professor of political science at Barnard, shows that the story of democracy in Europe is complicated. 

“The ultimate goal, she believes, is liberal democracy, with elections, respect for the rule of law, individual liberties and minority rights. But that is a rare, and hard-won, achievement. A step forward is often followed by a step back,”  said Max Strasser in a review published in The New York Times.

“This may seem a bit obvious to anyone familiar with the broad outlines of European history, but Berman makes the case clearly and convincingly. Moreover, at a moment when hyperventilating over the decline of democracy has grown into a veritable intellectual industry, her long-view approach comes across as appealingly sober,” Strasser added.