What We Are Reading: Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter

Updated 06 September 2018
0

What We Are Reading: Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter

  • Using multiple examples from Trump’s campaign, Adams outlines the methods and tools he sees as typical traits of master persuaders
  • Adams offers readers insights into how Trump persuaded the US public, kept the spotlight on himself, and maintained the topic of conversation of his choosing

Scott Adams uses his artistic touch and sense of humor to give readers an enjoyable, thought-provoking guide to the art of persuasion in his 2017 nonfiction book “Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don’t Matter.”

In 2016, he predicted that Donald Trump would win the US presidency when few others considered him a serious contender. What had Adams seen that many experts missed?

Using multiple examples from Trump’s campaign, Adams outlines the methods and tools he sees as typical traits of master persuaders. 

For instance, he discusses why it is highly effective to create a visual image for one’s target audience, such as the “big, beautiful wall” that Trump consistently referred to. 

It captured voters’ attention with a simple solution to the complex problem of illegal immigration and border control.

Adams offers readers insights into how Trump persuaded the US public, kept the spotlight on himself, and maintained the topic of conversation of his choosing. 

Using these tactical skills and more, he was able to essentially talk his way into the White House.


What We Are Reading Today: A People’s Constitution

Updated 15 November 2018
0

What We Are Reading Today: A People’s Constitution

Author: Rohit De

It has long been contended that the Indian Constitution of 1950, a document in English created by elite consensus, has had little influence on India’s greater population. Drawing upon the previously unexplored records of the Supreme Court of India, A People’s Constitution upends this narrative and shows how the Constitution actually transformed the daily lives of citizens in profound and lasting ways. This remarkable legal process was led by individuals on the margins of society, and Rohit De looks at how drinkers, smugglers, petty vendors, butchers and prostitutes — all despised minorities — shaped the constitutional culture.
The Constitution came alive in the popular imagination so much that ordinary people attributed meaning to its existence, took recourse to it, and argued with it. Focusing on the use of constitutional remedies by citizens against new state regulations seeking to reshape the society and economy, De illustrates how laws and policies were frequently undone or renegotiated from below using the state’s own procedures.
De examines four important cases that set legal precedents: a Parsi journalist’s contestation of new alcohol prohibition laws, Marwari petty traders’ challenge to the system of commodity control, Muslim butchers’ petition against cow protection laws, and sex workers’ battle to protect their right to practice prostitution.
Exploring how the Indian Constitution of 1950 enfranchised the largest population in the world, A People’s Constitution considers the ways that ordinary citizens produced, through litigation, alternative ethical models of citizenship.