UK embassy accuses Russia of ‘disinformation’ over Skripals

In this file photo, members of the emergency services fix the tent over the bench where a man and a woman were found on in critical condition at The Maltings shopping center in Salisbury, southern England. (AFP)
Updated 07 September 2018
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UK embassy accuses Russia of ‘disinformation’ over Skripals

MOSCOW: The British embassy in Moscow on Friday accused Russia of spreading “disinformation” after London charged two Russian citizens with the poisoning of ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in the UK.
The UK this week identified the men as Russian intelligence officers and said President Vladimir Putin was “ultimately” responsible for the March attack.
Moscow said pointing the finger at the Kremlin was “unacceptable.”
“Russia is distracting from the facts,” the UK embassy said on Twitter, after ambassador Laurie Bristow held a briefing on the case for foreign diplomats in the country.
The embassy accused Russia of spreading “37 disinformation narratives since March.”
On Wednesday Russian foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova questioned the authenticity of CCTV photographs which the UK police released of the suspects, implying it was suspicious that the time on the photographs was identical.
“Maria Zakharova asked why the times on two CCTV images were the same: these were images of the suspects arriving in the UK taken from two cameras covering separate lanes at international arrivals,” the embassy tweeted.
The “operation (was) almost certainly approved at senior levels of (the) Russian state,” it said.
But the embassy added that “UK concerns are with the Russian state, not the Russian people.”
Britain has previously accused Russia of orchestrating the attack, but Moscow denies any involvement and insists it is ready to cooperate on an investigation.


Hong Kong police demand better protection ahead of more protests

Updated 15 July 2019
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Hong Kong police demand better protection ahead of more protests

  • Hong Kong has been rocked by large and sometimes violent street protests over the now-suspended extradition bill
  • Critics of the bill say it threatens Hong Kong’s rule of law and want it completely withdrawn and Lam to step down

HONG KONG: A Hong Kong police officers’ union has urged police chiefs to better protect rank-and-file staff as the city braces for rolling protests in coming weeks over a controversial planned extradition treaty to mainland China.
In a letter to force management seen by Reuters, the Junior Police Officers’ Association said it wanted guarantees that police chief Stephen Lo and his senior managers could ensure their “safety and mental health.”
Three police officers were being treated in hospital on Monday for injuries sustained in skirmishes on Sunday.
Hong Kong has been rocked by large and sometimes violent street protests over the now-suspended extradition bill that would have allowed criminal suspects in Hong Kong to be sent to China to face trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party.
Critics of the bill say it threatens Hong Kong’s rule of law and want it completely withdrawn and Lam to step down.