Expanding oil services companies reach out to GCC partners

Petrofac is seeking an edge on rivals through local investment. (Supplied)
Updated 07 September 2018
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Expanding oil services companies reach out to GCC partners

  • Petrofac has made it clear that having a social license to operate — shorthand for supporting local economies — was a critical factor that determined whether it won tenders or not
  • Petrofac CEO Ayman Asfari: The delivery of in-country value, or ICV, is becoming increasingly important. The established national oil companies are prioritizing ICV

LONDON: Oil services and equipment companies are courting GCC partners to bolster local job creation and investment as they seek an edge on competitors to secure new business in the region.
The oil price recovery means there are more opportunities in the oil and gas sector after years of stagnation, although the KSA market has been relatively strong.
Petrofac, the oil services company with a growing reach in the Middle East, has made it clear that having a social license to operate — shorthand for supporting local economies — was a critical factor that determined whether it won tenders or not.
Petrofac CEO Ayman Asfari told Arab News: “The delivery of in-country value, or ICV, is becoming increasingly important. The established national oil companies are prioritizing ICV. In Abu Dhabi, for example, the tendering process now fully embeds ICV. It means that companies with the highest ICV have almost the right of first refusal on business.”
Active training and a development program of local talent are needed, he said.

 

ICV was a key focus area in Saudi Arabia. “More than 20 percent of our employees on the Fadhili project are Saudi nationals and our total local content across all our Saudi projects, including procurement, is expected to peak at more than 50 percent later this year,” said Asfari.
“On the question of the ICV, the in-country value, it’s really a license to operate now. It’s a requirement by clients increasingly. And unless you can meet that requirement, you will not be able to do business,” he added.
Elsewhere, London-listed Lamprell, based in the UAE, is looking to qualify as a contractor to Saudi Aramco under which contractors take up offshore engineering, procurement and construction and projects in the oil and gas sector.
An important aspect of this process is the Kingdom’s Total Value Add (IKTVA) program, which is intended to boost local investment and meet Vision 2030 objectives.
Lamprell strategy is to set up a Saudi limited liability company with KSA’s Asyad Holdings as a local partner.
Equipment and engineering services company Sparrows Group has recently been granted commercial registration to operate in KSA after it created a local JV.
Sparrows said: “A locally established company with the relevant commercial registration is a major requirement. The IKTVA program is sponsored by Saudi Aramco and is designed to drive increased investment, economic diversification, job creation and workforce development within the Kingdom.”

Decoder

The oil price recovery means there are more opportunities in the oil and gas sector after years of stagnation, though the KSA market has been relatively strong.


Saudi Real Estate Refinance Co. plans up to $1.07bn sukuk sale this year

Updated 41 min 46 sec ago
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Saudi Real Estate Refinance Co. plans up to $1.07bn sukuk sale this year

  • The plan by SRC, a subsidiary of Saudi Arabia’s sovereign Public Investment Fund, comes as it prepares to purchase more home loan portfolios
  • SRC, formed in 2017, is also keen to tap foreign institutional investors for its debt sale this year

RIYADH: Saudi Real Estate Refinance Co. (SRC), modelled on US mortgage finance firm Fannie Mae, aims to issue up to 4 billion riyals ($1.07 billion) of long-term sukuk this year, its chief executive said on Tuesday.

The plan by SRC, a subsidiary of Saudi Arabia’s sovereign Public Investment Fund, comes as it prepares to purchase more home loan portfolios from mortgage financing companies and banks to boost the Kingdom’s secondary mortgage market.

SRC, formed in 2017, is also keen to tap foreign institutional investors for its debt sale this year, Fabrice Susini told Reuters in an interview.

“Our strategy is clearly to tap the market twice this year,” he said. “We are really looking at probably issuing something between ... 2 and 4 billion riyal that we may be issuing in two tranches.

He said SRC was looking at sukuk in the 10 to 15-year range, to help minimize refinancing risks. “Generally speaking we are trying to issue as long as possible,” Susini said.

He said the company was assessing whether it could also issue bonds in currencies other than the local riyal.

In March, SRC completed a 750 million riyal sukuk issue with multiple tenors, under a program that allows it to issue up to 11 billion riyals of local currency denominated Islamic bonds.

“The rule of the game for us is, like many projects across the Kingdom, attract liquidity from foreign investors,” Susini said.

He said SRC had spent 1.2 billion riyals from its balance sheet buying mortgages from local mortgage financing companies and provided liquidity to these firms.

It has also signed initial accords with several commercial banks to acquire housing mortgage portfolios.

Saudi Arabia’s housing ministry is targeting the mortgage market to reach a total value of 502 billion riyals by 2020 from around 300 billion riyals now.

The government wants to increase activity in the real estate market as it moves to revitalize the economy and is taking steps to reform the sector as part of its 2030 reform plan.

It has been working with developers and local banks to counter a shortage of affordable housing — one of the country’s biggest social and economic problems. Saudi Arabia wants 60 percent of its nationals to own homes by 2020, up from 47 percent in 2016.

The size of real estate financing relative to its gross domestic product is 5 percent in Saudi Arabia compared to 69 percent in the United States, 74 percent in the United Kingdom and 43 pct in Canada, the housing ministry has said.

“The goal of SRC in this market was to make sure that we will be able to refinance at least around 10 percent of the market in 2020, and 20 percent of the market by 2028,” Susini told Reuters.