What We Are Reading Today: The Internet Trap by Matthew Hindman

Updated 08 September 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Internet Trap by Matthew Hindman

  • The internet has not reduced the cost of reaching audiences — it has merely shifted who pays and how

The internet was supposed to fragment audiences and make media monopolies impossible. Instead, behemoths like Google and Facebook now dominate the time we spend online — and grab all the profits from the attention economy.
The Internet Trap explains how this happened, says a review on the Princeton University Press website. This provocative and timely book sheds light on the stunning rise of the digital giants and the online struggles of nearly everyone else — and reveals what small players can do to survive in a game that is rigged against them.
The internet has not reduced the cost of reaching audiences — it has merely shifted who pays and how. Challenging some of the most enduring myths of digital life, Hindman explains why the internet is not the postindustrial technology that has been sold to the public, how it has become mathematically impossible for grad students in a garage to beat Google, and why net neutrality alone is no guarantee of an open internet.

 


What We Are Reading Today: The Manhattan Nobody Knows

Updated 16 November 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Manhattan Nobody Knows

Author: William B. Helmreich

Bill Helmreich walked every block of New York City — 6,000 miles in all — to write the award-winning The New York Nobody Knows. Now he has re-walked most of Manhattan — 721 miles — to write this new, one-of-a-kind walking guide to the heart of one of the world’s greatest cities.
Drawing on hundreds of conversations he had with residents during his block-by-block journey, The Manhattan Nobody Knows captures the unique magic and excitement of the island and highlights hundreds of facts, places, and points of interest that you won’t find in any other guide.
The guide covers every one of Manhattan’s 31 distinct neighborhoods, from Marble Hill to the Financial District, providing a colorful portrait of each area’s most interesting, unusual, and unfamiliar people, places, and things.
Along the way you will be introduced to an elderly Inwood man who lives in a cave; a Greenwich Village townhouse where Weathermen terrorists set up a bomb factory; a Harlem apartment building whose residents included W.E.B. DuBois and Thurgood Marshall; a tiny community garden attached to the Lincoln Tunnel.