50 Cent draws in celebrity friends’ star ‘Power’ to his show

Rapper-turned-producer 50 Cent is the executive producer behind ‘Power.’ (Photo supplied)
Updated 10 September 2018
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50 Cent draws in celebrity friends’ star ‘Power’ to his show

  • 50 Cent will continue as the show's producer despite his character being killed off
  • The rapper has plans to bring in some of his other celebrity friends into the show

DUBAI: 50 Cent’s character was killed in the latest episode of his hit television show “Power,” airing in the Middle East on Starz Play Arabia, but that does not mean that he will be stepping away.

Before becoming a ratings winner and the flagship show of the network, “Power” attracted viewers through 50 Cent being heavily promoted as its executive producer. The rapper brought a sense of realism to the African-American-led crime drama, a role he will continue to hold.

As a producer, 50 Cent has assisted the show in more ways than one. In a recent episode, he brought in Pulitzer Prize-winning rapper Kendrick Lamar for his acting debut on the show, a performance that garnered positive reviews from fans and critics.

“His response, just the general public’s response to his performance, was more encouraging than me. It was a huge response,” 50 Cent told Arab News.

50 Cent has plans to bring in some of his other celebrity friends as well. After their successful collaboration in the 2018 film “Den of Thieves,” 50 Cent and Gerard Butler have spoken about Butler potentially coming on the program. According to 50 Cent, “Den of Thieves” outperformed expectations because of how well the two of them got along, both on screen and off.

“With ‘Den of Thieves,’ we came in seven million over what they projected and they accounted that to my involvement and the things that we were doing marketing-wise during the promo. Me and Gerard, I think that also opened his interest and having the audience coming out to see him and me,” said 50 Cent.

Power’s audience overlaps strongly with Butler’s, 50 Cent said. “They love Gerard Butler, the same audience watching ‘Power,’ but they love when he’s playing aggressive characters like in ‘300’ or in ‘Law Abiding Citizen.’”

Who would be his dream guest star? 50 Cent did not hesitate to answer.

“Oh, De Niro. I’d bring De Niro. And he’s in New York! He’s always the dream guy to get.”


‘Broken Dinners, Postponed Kisses’ tells heart-wrenching story of Syria’s lost artists

Updated 15 November 2018
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‘Broken Dinners, Postponed Kisses’ tells heart-wrenching story of Syria’s lost artists

  • The 93-minute film follows six Syrian artists as they narrate their stories of displacement

BEIRUT: Filmmaker Nigol Bezjian premiered his latest movie “Broken Dinners, Postponed Kisses” with an intimate screening in Beirut on Wednesday night.
The 93-minute film — which features dialogue in Arabic, Armenian, German and English with English-language subtitles — follows six Syrian artists as they narrate their stories of displacement.
Bezjian, an Armenian born in Aleppo, Syria, spoke to Arab News about the experience of making the powerful film and said it was inspired by one of his previous works, “Thank You, Ladies and Gentlemen.”
“The movie is about Syrian refugees in the camps of Lebanon and it stayed with me,” he said about his previous film. “But I wanted to make a film about people in our region who had to depart their homeland, from the time of the end of World War I until today.”
That sparked the idea for his latest venture.
Bezjian chose six characters and honed in on their past experiences in what turned out to be an insightful peek through the keyhole into the lives of those who have been affected by the strife in Syria.
“The characters in the film are artists who work in different disciplines of art,” he explained.

“The film is something of a documentary, as the characters’ stories are all real, yet the concept that ties them all together was created by me,” the filmmaker continued.
Making an appearance are filmmaker Vartan Meguerditchian, actor Ayham Majid Agha, musician Abo Gabi, dancer Yara Al-Hasbani, painter Diala Brisly and photographer Ammar Abd Rabbo.
The film explores the inner feelings and reflections of people who had to leave their homes and be transported to a new environment, facing many challenges along the way.
Despite the sometimes heart-wrenching subject matter, Bezjian noted that the main challenges he faced while producing the film were budget and timeframe.
“The movie took two-and-a-half years (to make), so the main challenge was not to give up and keep the same spirit and momentum throughout this time,” he said.