Corner of Kent, England could replicate Dubai’s Palm Jumeirah islands

A huge lake in Ebbsfleet Garden City in the north of the English county is being touted for an island project. (Supplied: Ebbsfleet Development Corporation)
Updated 08 September 2018
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Corner of Kent, England could replicate Dubai’s Palm Jumeirah islands

  • A huge lake in Ebbsfleet Garden City in the north of the English county is being touted for an island project
  • The series of islands would all be linked by walkways and one of them would be become an arts and culture island

LONDON: Kent is set to host a series of man-made islands inspired by the Palm Jumeirah in Dubai in the UK’s first “Garden City” in 100 years.
A huge lake in Ebbsfleet Garden City in the north of the English county is being touted as an area where people would be able to grow and pick their own fruit and vegetables, visit an adventure playground for all ages or take part in sporting activities.
The series of islands would all be linked by walkways and one of them would be become an arts and culture island where open air productions and concerts could take place.
Floating hotel pods and an innovation area for start-up businesses would also be included as well as the Garden City’s very own beach.
And floating “eco islands” would encourage wildlife to live at the site in a series of insect hotels, bee hives and bat boxes.
The existing lake, which measures across 12 hectares, is currently inaccessible for the local community but could now be opened up and transformed.
The idea was the winning entry in an international landscape competition.
Called HALO, (Hives, Arcs, Links, Organics) the ambitious design would become one of the Garden City’s most prominent features.
Judges said HALO demonstrated exactly what they had hoped for — a design that was radical, but realisable. The panel was also excited by its possibilities, particularly because the design reflected the founder of the garden city movement, Ebenezer Howard’s concept of the best of town and country life.
Kevin McGeough, Director of Ebbsfleet Garden City’s Healthy New Towns project, said: “This exciting and inspiring design exceeded our expectations. We have been encouraged by the innovation and the wide variety of approaches in this scheme.
“The winning design could become one of the country’s most talked about and visited attractions.”


Sumatran elephant found dead with missing tusks in Indonesia

Updated 17 November 2018
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Sumatran elephant found dead with missing tusks in Indonesia

  • The cause of death was not immediately clear because the body was badly decomposed
  • At least 11 wild elephants died in Aceh last year, most of them killed by humans

BANDA ACEH, Indonesia: A Sumatran elephant has been found dead with its tusks removed in an apparent poaching case targeting the critically endangered animal, an Indonesian conservation official said Friday.
The 10-year-old male’s rotting corpse was found in Blang Awe village in Aceh province earlier this week.
“His tusks were missing and there were traces of blood in the location where he was found,” Aceh conservation center head Sapto Aji Prabowo told AFP.
Officials estimated the animal had been dead for at least a week when the carcass was discovered.
The cause of death was not immediately clear because the body was badly decomposed, Prabowo said.
Tissue samples will be analyzed for signs of poisoning.
Rampant deforestation has reduced the species’ natural habitat and brought them into conflict with humans, while their tusks are prized in the illegal wildlife trade.
At least 11 wild elephants died in Aceh last year, most of them killed by humans.
In July, a Sumatran elephant was found dead from apparent poisoning in a palm oil plantation.
The environment ministry estimates only around 500 Sumatran elephants remain in Aceh.