FaceOf: Mohammed bin Talal Al-Nahhas, governor of the Saudi Public Pension Agency

Updated 10 September 2018
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FaceOf: Mohammed bin Talal Al-Nahhas, governor of the Saudi Public Pension Agency

JEDDAH: Mohammed bin Talal Al-Nahhas has served as governor of the Public Pension Agency since his appointment in August 2016 upon a royal decree.

He is also a member of the board of directors at petrochemical manufacturing company SABIC, as well as the risk and sustainability and the remuneration and nomination committees.

Recently, he led his country’s delegation at the 116th session of the International Society for Social Security in Geneva.

Al-Nahhas has more than 30 years’ experience in banking, business development, and administration. He holds a bachelor’s degree in administration from King Saud University in Riyadh, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan Executive Business Administration Program in the US.

He is also the chairman of a public pension agency-owned company, AI-Raidah Investment Company, and the auditing and risk committee at AI-Raidah Investment.

Al-Nahhas has held several prestigious positions in the banking field, including general manager of branches of Al-Inma Bank, and regional manager of the central region branches of SAMBA Financial Group.

He also played an important role in launching and operating the largest Islamic banking network in the Kingdom and the Middle East.

In addition, Al-Nahhas is an executive member of the International Social Security Association (ISSA), a leading global organization that brings together institutions, bodies and government departments that manage any form of social security.

ISSA was founded in 1927 under the auspices of the International Labor Organization and it includes 322 organizations from 156 countries.


A man and his dog — bonded through Arab history

Updated 5 min 38 sec ago
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A man and his dog — bonded through Arab history

  • The image is the earliest evidence for the use of leashes to control dogs, with the earliest records previously found in Egypt, dating from 5,500 years ago
JEDDAH: Recent engravings discovered in northwestern Saudi Arabia depicting a man with a pack of hunting dogs are thought to be among the oldest records of man domesticating animals in the world.
Estimated to date back more than 9,000 years, the engravings, found at Shuwaymis and Jubbah, show a man drawing his bow and arrow surrounded by thirteen dogs, each with unique coat markings, and two on leads.
The area is home to over 1,400 rock carving panels, but these are now considered to be the crown jewel for the subject they convey, according to Maria Guagnin, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, which is overseeing the site in partnership with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage.
Despite the fact that Guagnin and her team cannot precisely date the panel, the condition of the rock and the sequence of the engraving suggest they date back at least nine millennia. However, there remains conflict over when domesticated dogs first arrived on the Arabian peninsula, and whether these animals were descended from the Arabian wold, or dogs tamed by other peoples abroad, somewhere between 15,000 to 30,000 years ago.
Certainly, the image is the earliest evidence for the use of leashes to control dogs, with the earliest records previously found in Egypt, dating from 5,500 years ago. 

Speculation for their development is also unclear — perhaps the leashed animals were more valuable than the others, or maybe the images depict a way to train new dogs.