Philippines, Jordan to fight terror jointly

A handout picture released by the Jordanian Royal Palace on September 6, 2018 shows Jordan's King Abdullah II (R) shaking hands with Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte in Amman. (Jordanian Royal Palace via AFP)
Updated 09 September 2018
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Philippines, Jordan to fight terror jointly

  • The two leaders noted that the scourge of terrorism continue to threaten their countries’ security
  • Jordan has agreed to provide two used Cobra attack helicopters to the Philippines, which will be delivered July next year

MANILA: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and Jordan’s King Abdullah II vowed to fight terrorism and violent extremism at their meeting in Amman, even as they both acknowledged that it could take years to end the menace.

Duterte, the first sitting Philippine president to visit Jordan, met the King on Thursday at Al -Husseinieh Palace Courtyard to discuss terrorism and the welfare of overseas Filipino workers (OFW).

During their talks, the two leaders noted that the scourge of terrorism continue to threaten their countries’ security, a major concern main that bind the two nations.

“Again over the past several months, if not the past year or two, the cooperation between our two countries to fight the evil that you have to suffer in your country as we suffer in ours, I think, is a testament to the international cooperation and coordination that is now becoming much more apparent, because this is an issue that’s going to last with us not only for the next five to 10, 15 years,” said King Abdullah II.

He added, “it will take a while to overcome the mentalities that these very horrible evil people perpetrated in your region and in mine..” 

For his part, Duterte concurred that “it will take us a lot more years to stop” terrorism. “Our concern against terrorism brings us here. Well, of course, as we have discussed, the arms would be of great help. If there’s any value, it is the friendship that goes with it,” he continued.

Jordan has agreed to provide two used Cobra attack helicopters to the Philippines, which will be delivered July next year.

Special Assistant to the President Christopher Go confirmed this to reporters, as the Philippines’s Department of National Defense (DND) and the Jordan Armed Forces-Arab Army also signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on defense cooperation.

Philippine officials said the two Cobra attack helicopters will be a big help in the military’s campaign against internal security threats, which include militant groups that have pledged allegiance to Daesh.

Duterte also expressed gratitude King Abdullah and to the people of Jordan for hosting Filipino workers in their country, and for treating them “very well.”

In a speech upon his arrival in Davao in the Philippines on Saturday, Duterte reported the signing of two labor agreements that will enhance the standards of  protection for Filipinos working there.

He emphasized that his government will continue to do its part to ensure that the rights of Filipinos working abroad are protected.

Aside from the MoU on defense cooperation, Duterte’s trip to Jordan also yielded nine investment deals worth $60.675 million. 


Millions of women still landless despite global push for equality

Updated 1 min 49 sec ago
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Millions of women still landless despite global push for equality

  • Throughout rural areas in Zimbabwe, for example, widows routinely find themselves harassed and exploited by in-laws claiming the property their husbands left behind
WASHINGTON: Millions of women worldwide are still unable to access and own land despite laws recognizing their rights, researchers and campaigners said on Monday as they urged countries to bridge the gap between policy and practice.
Patriarchal attitudes toward women and girls and a lack of knowledge of their own rights “prevent millions of women from owning land,” said Victoria Stanley, senior rural development specialist at the World Bank.
“Only 30 percent of the world’s population own land titles, and women are often the least likely to have any land registered,” she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on the sidelines of a World Bank conference in Washington, D.C.
“Stand for her land,” a campaign launched on Monday by the World Bank and advocacy groups including Landesa and Habitat for Humanity International, aims to change that by promoting better implementation of land laws for women.
Globally, more than 400 million women farm, yet only about 15 percent of farmland is owned by women, according to Landesa.
That inequality exposes women to all manner of rights abuses, rights activists say.
Throughout rural areas in Zimbabwe, for example, widows routinely find themselves harassed and exploited by in-laws claiming the property their husbands left behind.
Although Zimbabwe’s constitution gives women and men equal rights to property and land, in many rural communities tradition overrides national legislation, experts say.
Godfrey Massey of Landesa Tanzania said the existence of laws in itself does not necessarily translate into better access to land for women.
“Women can own land just as men, but few women are aware of this in Tanzania,” he said, calling for more initiatives at the community level to raise awareness of land rights.
“We’ve seen trainings lead to a rise in women joining village land councils or realizing that their husband can’t mortgage the family land without their consent,” he said.
Rajan Samuel of Habitat for Humanity India said that efforts to improve land rights must acknowledge cultural norms like India’s centuries-old Hindu caste system.
“You can have all the policies in the world, if you don’t engage the community from day one you won’t succeed,” he said.